baptism

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Related to Baptisms: baptized

baptism by fire

1. The first time a soldier enters combat. Taken from a phrase that originates from the Bible, in Matthew 3:11. As they marched onto the battlefield, you could see all of the uniformed boys become men as they experienced baptism by fire.
2. A difficult ordeal that one has to undergo through immersion and without preparation. One week into her new job, Mary felt like she was undergoing a baptism by fire when she was suddenly put in charge of the company's largest account.
See also: baptism, by, fire

baptism of fire

1. The first time a soldier enters combat. Taken from a phrase that originates from the Bible, in Matthew 3:11. As they marched onto the battlefield, you could see all of the uniformed boys become men as they experienced baptism of fire.
2. A difficult ordeal that one has to undergo through immersion and without preparation. One week into her new job, Mary felt like she was undergoing a baptism of fire when she was suddenly put in charge of the company's largest account.
See also: baptism, fire, of

baptism of fire

Fig. a first experience of something, usually something difficult or unpleasant. My son's just had his first visit to the dentist. He stood up to this baptism of fire very well. Mary's had her baptism of fire as a teacher. She was assigned to the worst class in the school.
See also: baptism, fire, of

baptism of fire

A severe ordeal or test, especially an initial one, as in This audition would be Robert's baptism of fire. This term transfers the original religious rite of baptism, whereby holiness is imparted, to various kinds of ordeal. At first it signified the death of martyrs at the stake, and in 19th-century France it was used for a soldier's first experience of combat. Currently it is used more loosely for any difficult first encounter.
See also: baptism, fire, of

a baptism of fire

COMMON If your first experience of a new situation is a baptism of fire, it is very difficult or unpleasant. They have given themselves a baptism of fire by playing the four best teams in the world. Having never managed a team before, I was suddenly managing thirty people. It was a baptism of fire. Note: This expression originally referred to the deaths of martyrs (= people who die because of their beliefs) by burning. It was later used by the French Emperors Napoleon Bonaparte and Napoleon III to refer to someone's first experience of battle.
See also: baptism, fire, of

a baptism of fire

a difficult introduction to a new job or activity.
A baptism of fire was originally a soldier's initiation into battle.
1998 Times Opposition spokesmen do not normally face a baptism of fire, but the Bank of England's unexpected decision…provided the Shadow Chancellor with an opportunity to make an early mark.
See also: baptism, fire, of

a ˌbaptism of ˈfire

an unpleasant or a frightening first experience of something: Her first day in the job was a real baptism of fire because she had to deal with a very difficult case immediately.
See also: baptism, fire, of
References in periodicals archive ?
Part One describes and defines the Scriptural, historical, and theological, perspectives of six different positions taken on the Baptism of the Holy Spirit.
Although it has been widely recognized that the text on baptism in Baptism, Eucharist and Ministry (1) reflects a deeper consensus than the other two texts, significant questions concerning the meaning and practice of baptism remain.
Participating witness: an Anabaptist Theology of Baptism and the Sacramental Character of the Church.
Another way to relive our baptism is by piously and lovingly reciting the Apostles' Creed.
9) A "thin description" would look only at the surface level of the event of a baptism of the Spirit as it might occur in either community.
For Strong, though, baptism signifies more than just the death and resurrection of Christ.
4) Every diocese should designate one or several people to evaluate how baptisms are conducted.
In fact, community formation is the larger topic and the topic of baptism in Calvin's Geneva merely provides the case study.
In November 2006, Salt Lake City researcher Helen Radkey, who researches Mormon violations of their own rules, discovered more than 700 records in the IGI that documented the 1999 posthumous baptisms for the Jews of Rome, all of whom were murdered in the gas chambers of Auschwitz in October 1943.
Pastor Nathan Bruce performed the baptisms and is a blogger on the Gazette website.
In 2006, 36 per cent of the Presbyterian congregations in the country (331 of 932 congregations reporting) did no baptisms at all; an almost 50 per cent increase from the 229 congregations who in 1992 did not celebrate any baptisms (23 per cent of 984 congregations reporting).
The decline in baptisms mirrors a long-term fall in church attendance overall.
A total of 20 people were welcomed into the Christian faith at the baptisms in a large water tank in the centre of York.
While I respect Father Bob Bedard's good motivation in attempting to direct Catholics toward a proper appreciation of the sacraments, I have to disagree with his claim that infant baptisms "should be delayed until the pastor can be assured the child will be reared in a faith-filled atmosphere.
Spierling is at her best when she shows the many ways that infant baptisms could go wrong in Reformed Geneva.