bank

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Bank Night

obsolete A lottery event popular in the US during the Great Depression in which a member of a movie theater audience could win a cash prize if their name was called. Primarily heard in US, South Africa. Wouldn't you know it? The one time they call my name for Bank Night and I had to leave early for a dinner party!
See also: bank, night

bankbook

1. Literally, a book in which a depositor's financial transactions, such as deposits and withdrawals, are recorded by a bank. Now make sure you don't lose the bankbook, or the teller won't deposit this check.
2. By extension, wealth or finances in general. I'm a little worried about how I'm going to pay my rent this month because my bankbook is rather thin these days.

Swiss bank account

A bank account held in Switzerland. Such accounts are highly confidential and are only identified by a number, rather than the owner's name. I suspect they're putting the embezzled funds into a Swiss bank account because we haven't been able to trace it. How are we going to get information on this transaction if it's going into a Swiss bank account?
See also: account, bank, Swiss

bank account

An account with a bank where one can withdraw or deposit funds. I have very little money in my bank account right now, so can we go out to dinner another night?
See also: account, bank

bank on

To rely on a future occurrence (even though it might not happen). I've really been banking on a holiday bonus this year—I don't have enough money to buy presents without it. I don't think you can bank on Tom coming tonight—he's really unreliable.
See also: bank, on

laugh all the way to the bank

To profit or benefit from something that is regarded by others as frivolous or stupid. That movie is dumb, but it's a big hit, and the studio executives will laugh all the way to the bank. They can mock us all they want because we'll be laughing all the way to the bank when our banana re-peeler is sold in stores nationwide.
See also: all, bank, laugh, way

break the bank

To be very expensive. The phrase is often used in the negative to convey the opposite. I don't have enough money to go on a vacation right now; I'm afraid it would break the bank. Here are my favorite discount options that won't break the bank.
See also: bank, break

can take (something) to the bank

Can believe a particular statement or piece of information because it is definitely true (at least according to the speaker). I heard from a very reliable source that this company is about to close—you can take it to the bank.
See also: bank, can, take

be laughing all the way to the bank

To be profiting or benefiting from something that is regarded by others as frivolous, stupid, or somehow objectionable. That movie is dumb, but it's a big hit, and the studio executives will be laughing all the way to the bank. They can mock us all they want because we'll be laughing all the way to the bank when our banana re-peeler is sold in stores nationwide.
See also: all, bank, laugh, way

cry all the way to the bank

To be unfazed by the fact that one has profited or benefited from something that others consider disreputable or shameful. I would be horrified to have my name attached to these trashy novels, but this author seems to be crying all the way to the bank. A: "That was such a terrible movie." B: "And I'm sure the actors are crying all the way to the bank."
See also: all, bank, cry, way

not break the bank

To be relatively inexpensive. Here are a few discount options that won't break the bank. If you're looking for a fabulous vacation that doesn't break the bank, I'd highly recommend camping in Colorado.
See also: bank, break, not

bank on something

Fig. to be so sure of something that one can trust it as one might trust a bank with one's money. I will be there on time. You can bank on it. I need a promise of your help. I hope I can bank on it.
See also: bank, on

bank something up

 (against something)
1. to heap or mound up something so that it presses against something. Walter banked the coals up against the side of the furnace. He banked up the coals against the side. Tim banked the coals up.
2. to heap or mound up something to guard against something. They had to build barriers to hide behind. They banked dirt and rubble up against the oncoming attackers. Who banked up this dirt against the flood? The river was rising, so we banked some dirt up.
See also: bank, up

break the bank

Fig. to use up all one's money. (Alludes to casino gambling, in the rare event when a gambler wins more money than the house has on hand.) It will hardly break the bank if we go out to dinner just once. Buying a new dress at a discount price won't break the bank.
See also: bank, break

can take it to the bank

Fig. able to depend on the truthfulness of my statement: it is not counterfeit or bogus; to be able to bank on something. Believe me. What I am telling you is the truth. You can take it to the bank. This information is as good as gold. You can take it to the bank.
See also: bank, can, take

cry all the way to the bank

Fig. to make a lot of money on something that one ought to be ashamed of. Jane: Have you read the new book by that romance novelist? They say it sold a million copies, but it's so badly written that the author ought to be ashamed of herself. Alan: I'm sure she's crying all the way to the bank. That dreadful movie had no artistic merit. I suppose the people who produced it are crying all the way to the bank.
See also: all, bank, cry, way

laugh all the way to the bank

Fig. to be very happy about money that has been earned by doing something that other people might think is unfair or that they criticized. He may not be in the nicest business, but he is doing well and can laugh all the way to the bank. She makes tons of money doing what no one else will do and laughs all the way to the bank.
See also: all, bank, laugh, way

bank on

Rely on, count on. For example, You can bank on Molly's caterer to do a good job. This expression alludes to bank as a reliable storage place for money. [Late 1800s]
See also: bank, on

break the bank

Ruin one financially, exhaust one's resources, as in I guess the price of a movie won't break the bank. This term originated in gambling, where it means that a player has won more than the banker (the house) can pay. It also may be used ironically, as above. [c. 1600]
See also: bank, break

laugh all the way to the bank

Also, cried all the way to the bank. Exult in a financial gain from something that had either been derided or thought worthless. For example, You may not think much of this comedian, but he's laughing all the way to the bank. Despite the seeming difference between laugh and cry, the two terms are virtually synonymous, the one with cry being used ironically and laugh straightforwardly. [c. 1960]
See also: all, bank, laugh, way

be laughing all the way to the bank

If someone is laughing all the way to the bank, they are making a lot of money very easily. Investors who followed our New Year share tips are laughing all the way to the bank. Note: You can also say that someone is crying all the way to the bank when something bad happens to them but they make a lot of money from it. With compensation claims for injuries like these, people are crying all the way to the bank. Note: This expression was used by the American entertainer Liberace when he was asked how he felt when he read bad reviews of his shows.
See also: all, bank, laugh, way

not break the bank

COMMON If something will not break the bank, it will not cost too much money. Porto Cervo is expensive, but there are other restaurants and bars that won't break the bank. With self-catering holidays, you can enjoy a refreshing change without breaking the bank. Note: If one gambler (= someone who risks money in order to win more) wins all the money that a casino has set aside to pay all the winning bets, they are said to have broken the bank.
See also: bank, break, not

break the bank

1 (in gambling) win more money than is held by the bank. 2 cost more than you can afford. informal
See also: bank, break

laugh all the way to the bank

make a great deal of money with very little effort. informal
1998 Country Life In the Taw Valley they don't need to say ‘cheese’ to raise a smile—they just whisper ‘environment’ and laugh all the way to the bank.
See also: all, bank, laugh, way

not ˌbreak the ˈbank

(informal) not cost a lot of money, or more than you can afford: Just lend me $20. That won’t break the bank, will it?
If you break the bank in a game or competition, you win more money than the bank holds.
See also: bank, break, not

laugh all the way to the ˈbank

(informal) make a lot of money easily and feel very pleased about it: With profits continuing to rise, both investors and company bosses are laughing all the way to the bank.
See also: all, bank, laugh, way

bank on

v.
To rely on someone or something: You can bank on her to get the job done when it has to be done quickly. I wouldn't bank on the bus arriving on time.
See also: bank, on

bank

1. n. money; ready cash. (From bankroll.) I can’t go out with you. No bank.
2. n. a toilet. (Where one makes a deposit.) Man, where’s the bank around here?
3. tv. to gang up on and beat someone. (An intransitive version is bank on someone.) They banked the kid and left him moaning.

bank on someone

in. to beat up on someone. (The transitive version is bank.) Freddy was banking on Last Card Louie and almost killed him.
See also: bank, on, someone

break the bank

To require more money than is available.
See also: bank, break

laugh all the way to the bank

To take glee in making money, especially from activity that others consider to be unimpressive or unlikely to turn a profit.
See also: all, bank, laugh, way
References in periodicals archive ?
Bankes was in charge of Sunderland's EFL Cup win over QPR last Wednesday and this weekend officiated Bristol City's 4-0 victory over Fulham a game he showed Fulham's Kevin McDonald a straight red in.
Bankes stayed with Lady Hester for some days while completing his drawings; however, their garrulous and strong personalities clashed.
Bankes tells us in his 1849 memorandum that the two Kingston Lacy pictures came, fittingly therefore, from a private Venetian residence, namely from 'the ceiling of a drawing room in the Palazzo Capello a San Felice (the next house upon the great Canal to the Casa d' Oro).
As in the Bankes case, they grow angry at other drivers who bother them.
She analyzes art with William Bankes and still feels emotionally attuned with Mrs.
Among the photos was a picture of the painting which hung in what was known to the Bankes family as the Rubens room and which is now used for wedding ceremonies.
Competition partner Charles Bankes continued: "This has been a truly international, collaborative effort from our teams here at the firm with lawyers from across our network helping clients from many jurisdictions to understand the likely implications and the steps they now need to consider.
Peter Bankes will take charge of the two clashes between Barnsley and Walsall, the first-leg taking place this afternoon as well as being fourth official for the FA Vase Final contested by Hereford and Morpeth Town.
Seyler recounts the discoveries of William John Bankes (1786-1855), who pioneered the study of ancient Egyptian history, language, and culture as an amateur.
Peter Bankes (Merseyside): Has been in the middle for 25 matches this season, booking 87 players and sending off six.
MAN IN BLACK MAN IN BLACK PETER BANKES (Merseyside) New to the League list this season, it's the first time he's been in charge of a Sky Blues game but he handled Fleetwood four times during their Conference years.
Lee Ingleby, Liz White, Ralf Little, Stephen Campbell Moore, Sophia Myles, Amelia Clarkson, Honor Kneafsey, Peter Wight, Anne Reid, Celia Imrie, Sally Bankes, Faye Brookes, Hayley Carmichael, Jonathan Cullen, Tom Hardman and Alice Orr-Ewing star.
Williams Denton advisory team Kelly Potter, Martin Barrett and Adam Owen with William Bankes of Gamlins
The Dubai headquarted bankEs total income grew to Dh1.
IN 1982, WHEN THE NATIONAL TRUST acquired Kingston Lacy, the Dorset home of Egyptologist William John Bankes (1786-1855), there was an untold amount of material to collate and catalogue--in particular, a collection of Egyptian relics gathered in the early 1800s.