Band-Aid

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Band-Aid

A quick and usually ineffective solution to a problem that only addresses the symptom and not the root cause. Refers to the trademark for a brand of adhesive bandages. Primarily heard in US. Lowering educational standards in schools may increase graduation rates, but it does little more than slap a Band-Aid on a much deeper problem.
References in periodicals archive ?
Our national policy seems to be based on using and reusing band-aids. When the country was shocked to the core last January with the incident in Kasur, the state's response was a band-aid.
Sometimes our band-aids cross over deep into the category of the absurd like assuming that the solution to the ills of PIA will come from what music is played (or not) during take-off and landing.
This year, Rachel and her family delivered hundreds of boxes of band-aids, bags of toys, and gift cards to Dora Castro-Ahillen, Child Life coordinator at Central DuPage.
The Band-Aids feature Marvel and Disney characters, animal prints, favorite TV shows, emojis and more.
The prince and the US star were chatting to delegates at a Commonwealth Youth Forum reception in London when Harry referred to using a "Band-Aid".
Illustrating the occasional language divide the couple may face, the prince, who was talking about finding long-term solutions, said: "Don't get sucked into the system of putting on a Band-Aid", before adding "American-style".
Johnson & Johnson Consumer Products Inc.'s Band-Aid brand adhesive bandages have been on the market for nearly a century, serving as a staple in families' first-aid kits.
Runners can protect their nipples with band-aids. Sweat may cause the adhesive to fail and the band-aids will fall off.
But band-aids are not always the best way to deal with problems; sometimes, more drastic surgery is required.
"(http://www.baltimoresun.com/news/maryland/freddie-gray/bs-md-ci-gray-changes-echo-20160416-story.html) It's just like putting a Band-Aid on a cut that needs to be sutured," long-time civil rights activist Helena Hicks, 81, told the Baltimore Sun.
But look closely, and the number of banclages in each pack varies: Dora, 25 strips manufactured under Johnson & Johnson's Band-Aid brand; Mickey, 20 bandages, also co-branded Band-Aid; and Angry Birds, 30 antibacterial bandages from MarketLab.
The problem with most compliance labeling programs is they start with a band-aid solution for a single specific customer.