ballpark

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hit (something) out of the (ball)park

To do or perform something extraordinarily well; to produce or earn an exceptional achievement. An allusion to hitting a home run in baseball that lands outside the stadium. Great job on that report, Jacobs—you really hit it out of the park! I'm pretty sure I hit that test out of the ballpark.
See also: hit, of, out

ballpark estimate

An approximate estimate. Mary contacted several plumbers to get a ballpark estimate of the cost to fix her leaky toilet.
See also: ballpark, estimate

ballpark figure

An approximate number; an estimate. Do you have a ballpark figure for the cost of the renovations? That's just a ballpark figure—they don't know exactly how many people will be attending the event.
See also: ballpark, figure

be in the same ballpark

To be close to a specific cost or amount. I will only sell the house if the buyer's offer is in the same ballpark as the price I want to get. No, the salary isn't as high as I had hoped, but I accepted it because it's in the same ballpark at least.
See also: ballpark, same

in the same ballpark

1. Close to a specific cost or amount. I will only sell the house if the buyer's offer is in the same ballpark as the price I want to get. No, the salary isn't as high as I had hoped, but I accepted it because it's in the same ballpark at least.
2. Similar in overall nature or characteristics. I think the two countries are in the same ballpark when it comes to environmental policies.
See also: ballpark, same

ballpark figure

Fig. an estimate; an off-the-cuff guess. I don't need an exact number. A ballpark figure will do.
See also: ballpark, figure

in the ballpark

Fig. within certain boundaries; [of an estimate] close to what is expected. Your estimate is not even in the ballpark. Please try again.
See also: ballpark

out of the ballpark

Fig. beyond the amount of money suggested or available. Your estimate is completely out of the ballpark. Just forget it.
See also: ballpark, of, out

ballpark figure

An acceptable, roughly accurate approximation, as in I know you can't tell me the exact cost; just give me a ballpark figure. This term alludes to a baseball field, which is always an enclosed space. The expression is basically an extension of the somewhat earlier in the ballpark, meaning within a reasonable range, and out of the ballpark, beyond a reasonable range. [Slang; late 1960s]
See also: ballpark, figure

in the ballpark

Also, out of the ballpark.See under ballpark figure.
See also: ballpark

a ballpark figure

or

a ballpark estimate

A ballpark figure or a ballpark estimate is an approximate figure or quantity. Note: A ballpark is a park or stadium where baseball is played. But what are we talking about here — a few thousand, millions, two bucks? Give me a ballpark figure. I think just in a ballpark estimate — about 60-40. Sixty would support, 40 percent would be opposed.
See also: ballpark, figure

in the ballpark

If someone or something is in the ballpark, their ideas, actions, or estimates are approximately right, although they are not exactly right. Note: A ballpark is a park or stadium where baseball is played. General manager J. P. Taylor received some offers, but none of them was in the ballpark. We estimate that a four-year undergraduate degree will cost in the ballpark of $57,000 by 2020. Doctor Adams pointed out that it cost about £5 — an underestimate, maybe, but in the right ballpark.
See also: ballpark

in the same ballpark

If one person or thing is in the same ballpark as another, the first person or thing is similar to the second, or is as good as the second. Note: A ballpark is a park or stadium where baseball is played. As a general investigative agency, they're not in the same ballpark as the FBI. Their outlets aren't in the same ballpark as the larger superstores.
See also: ballpark, same

in the ballpark

in a particular area or range. informal
The phrase originated in the USA, where a ballpark is a baseball ground.
See also: ballpark

a ˈballpark figure

a number which is approximately correct: I know we haven’t really discussed costs yet, but can you give me a ballpark figure?
See also: ballpark, figure

be in the same/right ˈballpark

(especially American English) be within the same/the right area or range of figures, etc: The offers for the contract were all in the same ballpark.
See also: ballpark, right, same
References in periodicals archive ?
Hagens Bermans most recent complaint against the MLB details the almost 90 foul ball and bat incidents that have occurred since the firm first filed its suit to make ballparks safer.
The Marlins are not the first to tarp off part of a ballpark due to attendance concerns, but are far and away the earliest at doing so.
Perhaps the most interesting essay in the book, Snyder-Grenier's "A Ballpark and Its 'City': Ebbets Field, Brooklyn, and Changing Times," is a solid piece of cultural history.
Columbia Park, in its limited lifetime of eight American League seasons (1901-08), was the smallest ballpark in the American League.
Paying tribute to Ebbets Field (Brooklyn 1913-57), classic design elements of the new ballpark include brick and limestone arches with keystones and arched mullions in the glass.
The new $25 million ballpark complex, to be built on riverfront land owned by Warren Stephens and the city of North Little Rock just east of the Broadway Bridge, will give fans a great view of the downtown Little Rock skyline.
significant movement toward the possibility of building a new ballpark in South Florida.
In 1989, Maryland Governor William Donald Schaeffer made a personal commitment to the Paralyzed Veterans of America that this ballpark would be fully accessible.
But, in digging deeper, distance from a ballpark has an effect.
A standing-room-only catwalk stood behind the leftfield fence and, unlike previous Los Angeles ballparks, Chutes Field had an infield of grass.
One of my favorite things about covering baseball is seeing all the different ballparks.
Our award-winning video, "Baseball--Real American Heroes," returns to scoreboard screens in most of the ballparks and hundreds of thousands of fans will take home special DAV baseball cards.
They've done major league ballparks in Arlington [for the Texas Rangers], Chicago [for the White Sox] and a project in Atlanta.
Tickled by the charm and success of Camden Yards in 1992, Major League baseball clubs have spent the last decade demolishing their old, "modern" stadiums and constructing new, "old-fashioned" ballparks for their teams.
It started in Baltimore, spread to Cleveland, Denver, and Arlington, finally found Seattle, and this season overtook Houston, Detroit, and San Francisco--the construction of new ballparks with an old-time ambiance.