ballpark

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hit (something) out of the (ball)park

To do or perform something extraordinarily well; to produce or earn an exceptional achievement. An allusion to hitting a home run in baseball that lands outside the stadium. Great job on that report, Jacobs—you really hit it out of the park! I'm pretty sure I hit that test out of the ballpark.
See also: hit, of, out

ballpark estimate

An approximate estimate. Mary contacted several plumbers to get a ballpark estimate of the cost to fix her leaky toilet.
See also: ballpark, estimate

ballpark figure

An approximate number; an estimate. Do you have a ballpark figure for the cost of the renovations? That's just a ballpark figure—they don't know exactly how many people will be attending the event.
See also: ballpark, figure

be in the same ballpark

To be close to a specific cost or amount. I will only sell the house if the buyer's offer is in the same ballpark as the price I want to get. No, the salary isn't as high as I had hoped, but I accepted it because it's in the same ballpark at least.
See also: ballpark, same

in the same ballpark

1. Close to a specific cost or amount. I will only sell the house if the buyer's offer is in the same ballpark as the price I want to get. No, the salary isn't as high as I had hoped, but I accepted it because it's in the same ballpark at least.
2. Similar in overall nature or characteristics. I think the two countries are in the same ballpark when it comes to environmental policies.
See also: ballpark, same

in the ballpark

Close to something specific, often a cost or amount. I will only sell the house if the buyer's offer is in the ballpark of the price I want to get. No, the salary isn't as high as I had hoped, but I accepted it because it's in the ballpark at least.
See also: ballpark

out of the ballpark

1. Far greater in number, size, or scope than what was predicted, expected, or suggested. I knew that this would get some media attention, but the amount it has received has been out of the ballpark! They said the repairs should only cost a few hundred dollars, but the final bill was way, way out of the ball park!
2. Extremely well or successfully. (Used almost exclusively in the phrase "hit (something) out of the ballpark." Great job on that report, Jacobs—you really hit it out of the ballpark! I'm pretty sure I hit that test out of the ballpark.
See also: ballpark, of, out

ballpark figure

Fig. an estimate; an off-the-cuff guess. I don't need an exact number. A ballpark figure will do.
See also: ballpark, figure

in the ballpark

Fig. within certain boundaries; [of an estimate] close to what is expected. Your estimate is not even in the ballpark. Please try again.
See also: ballpark

out of the ballpark

Fig. beyond the amount of money suggested or available. Your estimate is completely out of the ballpark. Just forget it.
See also: ballpark, of, out

ballpark figure

An acceptable, roughly accurate approximation, as in I know you can't tell me the exact cost; just give me a ballpark figure. This term alludes to a baseball field, which is always an enclosed space. The expression is basically an extension of the somewhat earlier in the ballpark, meaning within a reasonable range, and out of the ballpark, beyond a reasonable range. [Slang; late 1960s]
See also: ballpark, figure

in the ballpark

Also, out of the ballpark.See under ballpark figure.
See also: ballpark

a ballpark figure

or

a ballpark estimate

A ballpark figure or a ballpark estimate is an approximate figure or quantity. Note: A ballpark is a park or stadium where baseball is played. But what are we talking about here — a few thousand, millions, two bucks? Give me a ballpark figure. I think just in a ballpark estimate — about 60-40. Sixty would support, 40 percent would be opposed.
See also: ballpark, figure

in the ballpark

If someone or something is in the ballpark, their ideas, actions, or estimates are approximately right, although they are not exactly right. Note: A ballpark is a park or stadium where baseball is played. General manager J. P. Taylor received some offers, but none of them was in the ballpark. We estimate that a four-year undergraduate degree will cost in the ballpark of $57,000 by 2020. Doctor Adams pointed out that it cost about £5 — an underestimate, maybe, but in the right ballpark.
See also: ballpark

in the same ballpark

If one person or thing is in the same ballpark as another, the first person or thing is similar to the second, or is as good as the second. Note: A ballpark is a park or stadium where baseball is played. As a general investigative agency, they're not in the same ballpark as the FBI. Their outlets aren't in the same ballpark as the larger superstores.
See also: ballpark, same

in the ballpark

in a particular area or range. informal
The phrase originated in the USA, where a ballpark is a baseball ground.
See also: ballpark

a ˈballpark figure

a number which is approximately correct: I know we haven’t really discussed costs yet, but can you give me a ballpark figure?
See also: ballpark, figure

be in the same/right ˈballpark

(especially American English) be within the same/the right area or range of figures, etc: The offers for the contract were all in the same ballpark.
See also: ballpark, right, same

ballpark figure, a

A roughly accurate estimate, an educated guess. Coming from baseball, this expression rests in turn on in the ballpark, meaning within certain limits. Although both are generally applied to numerical estimates, neither appears to have anything to do with baseball scores.
See also: ballpark
References in periodicals archive ?
In the context of sports, previous research posited that the smells within ballparks may trigger memories of previous experiences (Lee et al., 2012).
The proposed new ballpark features a retractable roof that would allow fans to sit in air-conditioning.
Accessible seating is important to Karen Halgren, but there's one other aspect that ranks a little higher on her ballpark list--parking.
Ebbets Field: Essays and Memories of Brooklyn's Historic Ballpark, 1913-1960.
So I understand how a terrible accident, like the one that happened recently at Rangers Ballpark in Arlington, Texas, could occur.
For nearly 100 years, Wrigley Field survived a series of threats from organized baseball, new-era ballparks, and warring neighbors.
Major League DAV Day at the Ballpark Games Home Team Game Date Opponent * Seattle Mariners Saturday, April 18 Tigers Kansas City Royals Saturday, May 16 Orioles St.
ARAMARK will implement and expand practices at ballparks such as Citizens Bank Park, Coors Field, Fenway Park, McAfee Coliseum, Minute Maid Park, Oriole Park at Camden Yards and PNC Park.
HOK has designed or renovated 20 of the 30 major league ballparks, including the $700 million home of the Washington Nationals, which opens this year, and the $1.3 billion Yankee Stadium that will open in 2009.
As Keating estimated, "During the 20th century, more than $20 billion has been spent on major league ballparks, stadiums, and arenas.
This is the wave of the future, like downtown ballparks. Build something insane and you will be inundated with nomadic rippers who spend money.
A group calling itself Soy Happy is mounting a campaign to bring veggie dogs to ballparks across the US.
Old, bulky, huge multipurpose stadiums are striking out, while new, high-tech yet traditional-style, single-purpose ballparks are hitting home runs,
While the actual sport of baseball is an excellent metaphor for the free market (illustrating how individuals and teams work together and compete against one another), at the professional level nearly all the teams play in government-owned or government-subsidized ballparks. Boston's Fenway Park and Chicago's Wrigley Field are not only rare gems from the perspective of baseball's traditions, but also from the perspective of sound economics -- both were privately built and are privately owned.