bane

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bane of (one's) existence

The source or cause of one's misfortune, unhappiness, frustration, or anxiety, usually used hyperbolically. I swear, this project is the bane of my existence. I've been working on it for months and still haven't made any real progress! Jane has been constantly annoying me all week. She's been the bane of my very existence!
See also: bane, existence, of

rickle o' banes

A Scottish phrase used to describe someone who is extremely thin. A "rickle" is a group of something, while "banes" are bones. You've just become a rickle o' banes during your time abroad, so I'm going to make all of your favorite meals now that you're home.
See also: bane

the bane of (one's) life

The source or cause of one's misfortune, unhappiness, frustration, or anxiety, usually used hyperbolically. I swear, this project is the bane of my life. I've been working on it for months and still haven't made any real progress! Jane has been constantly annoying me all week. She's been the bane of my life!
See also: bane, life, of

the bane of somebody’s ˈlife/eˈxistence

a person or thing that makes somebody’s life unpleasant or unhappy: That car is always breaking down! It’s the bane of my life. OPPOSITE: a ray of sunshine
See also: bane, existence, life, of

bane of one's existence, the

The agent of one’s ruin or misery; a thorn in the flesh. The earliest meaning of the noun bane was “murderer” and was so used in Beowulf (ca. a.d. 800). A somewhat later meaning was “poison,” which survives as part of the names of various poisonous plants, such as henbane or wolf’s bane. The current sense, an agent of ruin, dates from the late 1500s. Today it is almost always used hyperbolically, as in “The new secretary loses all my messages; she’s become the bane of my existence.”
See also: bane, of
References in periodicals archive ?
Dancing Women reaches closure as Banes analyzes George Balanchine's Agon and in so doing rebuts the critique of Balanchine by Ann Daly (in The Drama Review, April 1987) that launched feminist dance history more than ten years ago.
And yet Banes evolves a persuasive reading of the work's representation of women that confronts rather than evades the work's formal ambiguity.
The images-of-women approach favored by Banes illuminates continuities between nineteenth-century ballet and twentieth-century theatre dance that other feminist critics have overlooked.
Banes comments on the "politically progressive" 'casting, for "during a period of intense straggle in the United States over civil rights" the ballet "unabashedly presented an erotic love duet between a black man and a white woman." Fair enough, but what about the racial politics of ballet that made Balanchine's casting decision so noteworthy?
Banes is well aware of the racially exclusive nature of the canon she discusses.
Banes said one of the men drove the vehicle after they tied him up.
Coaches Mon Jose and Aris Dimaunahan will assist Banes and Ganon Baker in the five-day long camp to be held at Ronac Center from 1pm-4pm.
Training with Ganon Baker dramatically changes player performance and coaching approaches, Banes said.
Turns out, "The Dark Knight Rises" did originally contain a deeper explanation of Bane's origin story than once thought.
Because Bane was created in 1992, there should be no way to tie his origin in with Bain Capital, which was little known at the time.
"As for his appearance in The Dark Knight Rises, Bane is a force for evil and the destruction of the status quo," Dixon said in (http://comicbook.com/blog/2012/07/17/rush-limbaugh-banes-creator-weighs-in/) a separate interview with ComicBook.com .
"The villain in 'The Dark Knight Rises' is named Bane, B-a-n-e.
Do you think that it is accidental that the name of the really vicious, fire-breathing, four-eyed, whatever-it-is villain in this movie is named Bane?"