atmosphere

(redirected from Atmospheres)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia.
Related to Atmospheres: Planetary atmospheres

clear the atmosphere

To alleviate tension, often in a group setting. Similar to the phrase "clear the air." I know my parents are still mad at me for missing curfew, so I'm going to try to clear the atmosphere this morning by apologizing profusely.
See also: atmosphere, clear

you could cut the atmosphere with a knife

The situation was very tense and perhaps on the verge of conflict. Today was the first meeting since Hal got promoted to be his old supervisor's boss, and you could cut the atmosphere with a knife.
See also: atmosphere, could, cut, knife

heavy silence

A very tense, awkward, or uncomfortable silence among a group of people. There was a heavy silence at the table after Dad's outburst at Mom. I tried to break the heavy silence with a joke, but no one was in the mood for laughing.
See also: heavy, silence

heavy atmosphere

A very tense, awkward, or uncomfortable atmosphere among a group of people. There was a heavy atmosphere at the table after Dad's outburst at Mom. I tried to break the heavy atmosphere with a joke, but no one was in the mood for laughing.
See also: atmosphere, heavy

you could cut (something) with a knife

Something intangible or non-solid is incredibly thick, palpable, or poignant. The air was so humid as we stepped off the plane if felt like you could cut it with a knife. The entire dinner was so awkward you could cut the tension with a knife.
See also: could, cut, knife

you could cut the atmosphere with a knife

If you say you could cut the atmosphere with a knife, you mean that the atmosphere in a place is extremely tense or unfriendly. There have been some embarrassing silences at meal times. You could cut the atmosphere with a knife. Note: You can use air, or a word such as tension that refers to an unpleasant feeling, instead of atmosphere. As soon as we entered the church, you could cut the air with a knife. At secondary school, the tension on parents' nights can be cut with a knife.
See also: atmosphere, could, cut, knife

an atmosphere that you could cut with a knife

a general feeling of great tension or malevolence.
See also: atmosphere, could, cut, knife, that

you could ˌcut the atmosphere with a ˈknife

(informal) used to say that the emotional tension, embarrassment, etc. shared by a group of people is very great: When John came in with his new girlfriend, you could have cut the atmosphere with a knife.
See also: atmosphere, could, cut, knife

a heavy ˈsilence/ˈatmosphere

a situation when people do not say anything, but feel embarrassed or uncomfortable: There was a heavy silence for a few minutes before anybody spoke.
References in periodicals archive ?
Nor are atmospheres something subjective, for example determinations of a psychic state.
When Glenn Schneider and one of us (J.M.P.) looked at observations of the 2004 transit made by NASA's TRACE spacecraft, we were surprised at how easily visible Venus's atmosphere was.
The astronomers detected spectral signs from a tiny fraction of the star's light filtering through the planet's upper atmosphere during a transit.
Sun-watching space observatories such as SOHO (Solar and Heliospheric Observatory) and TRACE (Transition Region and Coronal Explorer), which orbit above Earth's turbulent atmosphere, should have ringside seats for the transit.
Decherd of North Carolina State University in Raleigh and her colleagues investigated the effects such an atmosphere might have had on plants.
The composition of the resin pyrolysis products is temperature dependent, with higher temperatures generally producing more reducing atmospheres as well as increasing the amounts of gases produced.
Although Earth and the moon inhabit the same cosmic neighborhood, our planet has far fewer scars from extraterrestrial impacts because incoming objects burn up in its atmosphere. A new computer model suggests that Earth's thin layer of air is an even better shield than previously thought.
The picturesque hazes of Tennessee's Smoky Mountains appear when volatile organic chemicals released by trees react with other gases in the atmosphere. And every time a raindrop falls into the ocean, microscopic droplets of salt water splatter upward into the atmosphere.
X rays from the sun induce the emissions when they interact with atoms in Mars' upper atmosphere. The atoms absorb the radiation and reemit it at a lower X-ray energy, a process known as fluorescent scattering.
The new observations, the researchers say, demonstrate that telescopes will ultimately have the capability to measure the composition of a variety of extrasolar planets' atmospheres and search for chemical markers of life beyond Earth.
Dust cools Earth by blocking sunlight from reaching the ground but absorbs some of the sunlight and so warms the atmosphere directly.
Although experiments at room temperature in small containment chambers made of diamond, called diamond-anvil cells, brought hydrogen stably to pressures exceeding 2 million atmospheres, evidence of electrical conductivity never turned up-leaving scientists both frustrated and perplexed.
The relatively high concentration of krypton and xenon detected by the spectrometer may thus attest to the importance of comets in determining the chemical evolution of planetary atmospheres.
The solar system has 12 bodies with atmospheres: all of the planets except Mercury, three satellites (Io, Titan, and Triton), and the sun.
And it seemed that meteorites striking the young planets might account for the concentrations of noble gases - chemically inert substances- in the atmospheres of these planets.
Full browser ?