Athanasian wench

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Athanasian wench

obsolete A derogatory term for a lascivious woman who readily has sex with any man who asks for it. Taken from the Athanasian Creed, an early Christian statement of belief from at least the 6th century, the opening words of which translate as "whosoever wishes." Sir, how dare you. I am not one of your Athanasian wenches, ready to indulge your lust at a moment's notice!
References in periodicals archive ?
Thus, in the eyes of the Dissenters, Catholicism, the branch of Christianity that "denied to the laity the use of the bible," (20) had installed itself in the early versions of the text; Anglicanism had been at best tolerant of such additions and at worst eager to imitate the Catholic example of excessive elaboration of doctrines that Dissenters found suspect (such as the Nicene and Athanasian Creeds that required belief in the Trinity).
The Athanasian Creed was something of a touchstone in debates about doctrinal authority throughout the Victorian period (see Chadwick, especially 150).
(38.) "The Athanasian Creed," The Catholic Encyclopedia, www.newadvent.org/cathen/02033b.htm.
"The Athanasian Principle in Williams's Use of Images." The Rhetoric of Vision: Essays on Charles Williams.
Della Robbia's account of the final hours of Agostino Capponi and Pietro Boscoli, sentenced to death in 1513 as conspirators against the Medici, reveals that the men read the Athanasian Creed (which details Christ's Passion, descent into hell, Resurrection and Last Judgment in a discourse on salvation), contemplated the Miserere mei Deus, one of the seven penitential psalms, and denial of Peter (Mark 14:66-72), and recited Psalm 69 ('Save me, O God; for the waters are come in unto my soul') and, repeatedly, the Credo, intermittently, the brothers of the Compagnia dei Neri sang penitential psalms and, at some point, arranged for a Savonarolan Dominican friar to serve as a spiritual counsellor to the two prisoners and take (or coax) their confessions.
for a future State," and criticizes the damnatory clauses of the Athanasian creed by attributing it to the bishop's "Zeal." (30) Whatever particular faith or faiths Dryden at this point had in mind when comparing word-for-word translation with "Superstition, blind and zealous," it is clear that he considered it a false one, proceeding from a too-strict adherence to the letter of the original author.
Creeds--from the Latin word credo, or "I believe"--have long been part of the Christian tradition: the Apostles' Creed spells out the faith of the apostles; the Athanasian Creed focuses on the fifth-century understanding of Jesus; the 1968 "Credo of the People of God" reaffirms Catholic truths in the face of modernity.
The Fathers of the Church would hardly dispute a fundamental article of Christian belief which, with scriptural authority, is part of the Athanasian creed.
The Council of Nicaea in 325, the Council of Constantinople in 381, the Athanasian Creed in the sixth century, even Pope Paul VI's "Credo of the People of God," published as late as 1968, and multiple others all attempted at different times, in the face of different questions, to reformulate the fundamentals in ways that could be understood by people at that time.
(12) Pelikan summarizes the importance of belief in the Trinity in the Middle Ages: "After affirming that `whoever wants to be saved, it is necessary above all that he hold the catholic faith,' the Athanasian Creed had gone on to specify the two cardinal dogmas that formed the main content of that faith.
I think that even if the creeds from the so-called Apostles to the so-called Athanasian were swept into oblivion; and even if the human race should arrive at the conclusion that, whether a bishop washes a cup or leaves it unwashed is not a matter of the least consequence, it will get on very well.
cit., 27; Bell, Jews and Christians in Egypt: the Jewish Troubles in Alexandria and the Athanasian Controversy (London, 1924), 10-21.
Similarly, whereas he had rejected the Athanasian Creed as a young man and had finally found an avenue for its acceptance in Maurice's liberal interpretation of negative doctrines like eternal punishment, in 1865 he seems closer to a position of casuistry or mental reservation than to one of a via media: For myself, I can sign the Articles in their literal sense toto corde, and subscription is no bondage to me, and so I am sure can you.
According to tradition, many congregations will recite the Athanasian Creed, the Christian Church's confession of the doctrine of the Most Holy Trinity - the three persons in one God -- all three of whom as distinct and co-eternal persons.
Athanasian, "Surgical management for malignant tumors of the thumb," Hand, vol.