argument

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arguing for the sake of arguing

Continuing a disagreement solely out of obstinacy. We have a potential compromise, so he's just arguing for the sake of arguing now.
See also: argue, of, sake

arguing for the sake of argument

Continuing a disagreement solely out of obstinacy. We have a potential compromise, so he's just arguing for the sake of argument now.
See also: argue, argument, of, sake

be spoiling for (something)

To be particularly eager or enthusiastic for something. Used especially in the phrase "be spoiling for a fight." Come on, don't engage with that drunken fool, he's spoiling for a fight! We've done everything we can to reach a reasonable compromise with the other party, but they have been spoiling for an argument at every turn.
See also: spoil

for the sake of argument

Just to consider an alternative to something being discussed. I know you want to go to Stanford, but just for the sake of argument, let's talk about what some of the other schools you got into have to offer.
See also: argument, of, sake

get into an argument

To begin to argue with someone about something. So I heard that you two got into an argument last night—what was it about?
See also: argument, get

get into an argument about (someone or something)

To begin to argue with someone about something. So I heard that you and Dan got into an argument about money last night. Please don't get into an argument about politics at the dinner table.
See also: argument, get

get into an argument about (someone or something) with (someone)

To begin to argue with someone about something. So I heard that you got into an argument about money with Dan last night. Please don't get into an argument about politics with anyone at the dinner table.
See also: argument, get

get into an argument over (someone or something)

To begin to argue with someone about something. So I heard that you and Dan got into an argument over money last night. Please don't get into an argument over politics at the dinner table.
See also: argument, get, over

get into an argument over (someone or something) with (someone)

To begin to argue with someone about something. So I heard that you got into an argument over money with Dan last night. Please don't get into an argument over politics with anyone at the dinner table.
See also: argument, get, over

get into an argument with (one) over (someone or something)

To begin to argue with one about someone or something. So I heard that you got into an argument with Dan over money last night. Please don't get into an argument with anyone over politics at the dinner table. I keep getting into arguments with Mary over the kids.
See also: argument, get, over

get into an argument with (someone)

To begin to argue with someone about something. So I heard that you got into an argument with Dan last night—what was it about? Please don't get into an argument with your sister at the dinner table.
See also: argument, get

get into an argument with (someone) about (someone or something)

To begin to argue with someone about something. So I heard that you got into an argument with Dan about money last night. Please don't get into an argument with anyone about politics at the dinner table.
See also: argument, get

have an argument (with someone)

To engage in a verbal fight or disagreement with someone; to argue. Oh boy, what did you and Mom have an argument about this time? I don't want to have an argument with you about your spending every time the credit card bill comes in, OK?
See also: argument, have

pick a quarrel

To act or speak toward someone in an aggressive or antagonistic way so as to provoke them into an argument or fight. I don't know why she was so critical of me tonight—it's like she was trying to pick a quarrel or something. He's the kind of troll who just posts on the message board to pick a quarrel with other members. After ten years of working in this bar, I know how to spot a patron looking to pick a quarrel with people.
See also: pick, quarrel

sledge-hammer argument

A strong argument that eliminates all opposition. I really want to win the debate next week, so I'm preparing a real sledge-hammer argument.
See also: argument

throw (something) back and forth

1. To take turns tossing something between one another. My son and I discussed a lot of things while we threw the baseball back and forth in the back yard. The bullies stole the girl's stuffed animal and threw it back and forth above her head.
2. To discuss various ideas, points, arguments, etc., with one another. We all sat around the table and threw ideas for a new product back and forth. We started something of an informal debate about the topic, throwing arguments and counterpoints back and forth for the duration of the class.
3. To alternate making verbal attacks, insults, quips, etc., at one another. My dad and my boyfriend kept throwing snide remarks back and forth throughout the dinner, until eventually I snapped at them to cut it out. The two presidential candidates spent the entirety of the debate throwing insults back and forth.
See also: and, back, forth, throw

toss (something) back and forth

1. To take turns throwing something lightly or casually between one another. My son and I discussed a lot of things while we tossed the baseball back and forth in the back yard. The bullies stole the girl's stuffed animal and tossed it back and forth above her head.
2. To discuss various ideas, points, arguments, etc., with one another. We all sat around the table and tossed ideas for a new product back and forth. We started something of an informal debate about the topic, tossing arguments and counterpoints back and forth for the duration of the class.
3. To alternate making verbal attacks, insults, quips, etc., at one another. My dad and my boyfriend kept tossing snide remarks back and forth throughout the dinner, until eventually I snapped at them to cut it out. The two presidential candidates spent the entirety of the debate tossing insults back and forth.
See also: and, back, forth, toss
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

arguing for the sake of arguing

 and arguing for the sake of argument
arguing simply to be difficult or contrary. You are just arguing for the sake ofarguing. You don't even know what the issue is. He is annoying, because he is always arguing for the sake of argument.
See also: argue, of, sake

get into an argument (with someone) (about someone or something)

 and get into an argument (with someone) (over someone or something)
to enter a quarrel with someone about someone or something. I don't want to get into an argument with you about Dan. Mary got into an argument about money with Fred. I really don't want to get into an argument.
See also: argument, get

have an argument (with someone)

to argue with someone. Let's not have an argument with the boss. Tom and John had an argument.
See also: argument, have

pick a quarrel

(with someone) Go to pick a fight (with someone).
See also: pick, quarrel
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

argument

see under pick a quarrel.

pick a quarrel

Also, pick an argument or fight . Seek an opportunity to quarrel or argue with someone. For example, I don't want to pick a quarrel with you, or Jason was always in trouble for picking fights. These terms use pick in the sense of "select." [Mid-1400s]
See also: pick, quarrel
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

for the sake of ˈargument

as a starting point for a discussion; to discuss things in theory only: For the sake of argument, let’s say that prices continue to rise by 20 per cent a year.
See also: argument, of, sake

be ˌspoiling for a ˈfight, argument, etc.

want to fight, argue, etc. with somebody very much: Are you spoiling for a fight?The teachers’ union is spoiling for a fight with the Government.
See also: spoil
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017
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References in periodicals archive ?
A spokeswoman for the Judicial Branch said Monday that the Court of Appeals, unlike the Minnesota Supreme Court, has no plans to post videotapes of oral arguments. The court travels a great deal, she said, making it hard to consistently arrange video recordings of its proceedings.
It noted that the oral arguments will proceed on August 28, 2:00 p.m.
On the other hand, Deputy Prosecutor General NAB Sardar Muzaffar will also record his argument.
Judges explain that the reduction in the number of oral arguments is based primarily on the premise that oral argument is time-consuming and not helpful.
It is not, and does not seek to be, a close examination of the wager argument.--Jeff Jordan, University of Delaware
The main contribution of this work are instructions how to enable a general machine learning algorithm to use arguments. This includes presenting explanations in terms of arguments and the definition of the constraint that arguments impose on learning.
The percentage of cases in which oral argument is granted and the time allotted for argument has steadily decreased over time in both state and federal courts.
The aim of your interview guide should be to capture the argument the innovator is making.
In the second chapter, Lorenzo considers arguments opposing war beginning with Washington and Jefferson through the Spanish-American War.
The Function Arguments dialog switches over to show the arguments required for TEXT.
Estrella Elamparo said after oral arguments last January 19 and 26, only Poe was able to present her arguments before the high court.
These and other truisms reflect some of the shortcomings of appellate oral arguments. Judges may have already made up their minds, yet during oral argument they engage in what hindsight proves to be merely polite conversation about the losing party's arguments.
TEHRAN (FNA)- Arguments are tricky and we spend a lot of our time trying to persuade others.
ALES uses different mining techniques to manage a highly structured arguments repository.
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