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Related to Ants: Carpenter ants

ants in the/(one's) pants

Said of one who is unable to sit still, due to anxiety, excess energy, or impatience. The phrase is typically used with the verb "have." The kids really have ants in the pants today, so I'm going to take them to the playground. A: "Why is Carrie pacing?" B: "She's waiting for her doctor to call, so she's had ants in her pants all day."
See also: ant, pant

have ants in the/(one's) pants

1. To be unable to sit still, due to anxiety, excess energy, or impatience. The kids really have ants in the pants today, so I'm going to take them to the playground. A: "Why is Carrie pacing?" B: "She's waiting for her doctor to call, so she's had ants in her pants all day."
2. To be interested in or in pursuit of sexual activity. You've been single for awhile now—don't you have ants in the pants yet?
See also: ant, have, pant

have got ants in the/(one's) pants

To be unable to sit still, due to anxiety, excess energy, or impatience. The kids really have got ants in the pants today, so I'm going to take them to the playground. A: "Why is Carrie pacing?" B: "She's waiting for her doctor to call, so she's got ants in her pants."
See also: ant, have, pant

pissant

1. adjective Completely worthless; too small, trivial, or unimportant to care about. Nearly 50 years of loyal service, and the only thing they give me when I retire is this pissant watch. It isn't even a Rolex! Some pissant company is trying to sue us over patent infringement. Don't they know who we are?
2. Someone who is utterly worthless, unimportant, or reprehensible. If you think I'm going to take orders from a pissant like you, you've got another think coming! I can't believe they hired that pissant to coach the team!

warrior ant

A species of ant that is known to travel in armies and capture other ants. In today's class, we will study the behavior of the warrior ant.
See also: ant, warrior

*ants in one's pants

Fig. nervousness and agitation, (on the image of someone suffering great discomfort as if having actual ants in the pants. *Typically: get ~; have ~; give one ~.) I always get ants in my pants before a test. I wonder if all acton get ants in their pants before they go onstage.
See also: ant, pant

ants in one's pants, have

1. Be extremely restless, uneasy, impatient, or anxious, as in This child just can't sit still; she must have ants in her pants. This rhyming idiom calls up a vivid image of what might cause one to be jumpy. [Slang; 1920s]
2. Be eager for sexual activity, as in Bill's got ants in his pants for Rita. This usage is less common today. [Slang; 1920s]
See also: ant, have

have ants in your pants

INFORMAL
If someone has ants in their pants, they cannot keep still. They all had ants in their pants, incapable of sitting in their seats for more than six minutes at a stretch.
See also: ant, have, pant

have ants in your pants

be fidgety or restless. informal
See also: ant, have, pant

have ants in your pants

(informal) be unable to stay still because you are anxious or excited about something: Relax and enjoy yourself — you’ve really got ants in your pants about something tonight!
See also: ant, have, pant

have ants in one’s pants

tv. to be nervous and anxious. (see also antsy. Have got can replace have.) All kids’ve got ants in their pants all the time at that age.
See also: ant, have, pant

pissant

and piss-ant
1. n. a wretched and worthless person. (Often objectionable.) Look, you silly pissant, beat it!
2. mod. worthless. (Often objectionable.) I don’t want this little pissant piece of pie. Give me a real piece.

piss-ant

verb

ants in (one's) pants

Slang
A state of restless impatience.
See also: ant, pant

ants in one's pants

Extremely restless, jumpy. This vivid metaphor no doubt has survived because of its rhyming character, just as alliteration enhanced its seventeenth-century forerunner, a breeze (gadfly) in one’s breech(es). Several twentieth-century writers are credited with popularizing the phrase; among them are George Kaufman and Moss Hart, in The Man Who Came to Dinner (1939): “I’ll get the ants out of those moonlit pants.” The cliché also gave rise to the slangy adjective antsy, for restless or jumpy.
See also: ant, pant
References in periodicals archive ?
Though the same active ingredients are often found in both types of products, the gels are more likely to have sweet, sugary baits, which are often favored by the types of ants found indoors, he said.
At the time, the scientists assumed the body parts were leftovers after a trap-jaw ant colony abandoned their nest and the F.
Fire ants are an invasive species common in the Deep South.
"If temperatures remain high, we also expect this to really be a bumper year for flying ants, which could manifest itself at 'Flying Ant Day'- the 'nuptial flight' stage of ant reproduction where swarms of flying ants are prominent," he added.
Flying ant day usually occurs in July, but experts say unseasonably warm weather means it could happen this month - and lead to an extra 50 billion of the ants in UK skies.
However, when the researchers analyzed the odiferous hydrocarbons on the ants' bodies--the ant world's way of cueing the insects into whether they are encountering a nest mate or an outsider--they found that neither of these explanations told the entire story.
The container the ants were found in was shipped from China's Fujian Province.
Because of the huge surge in the number of ants, the number of flying ants - when ants sprout wings and go on 'nuptial flights' in search of a mate - this year is expected to take place earlier than normal.
Outside the Kuala Belalong Field Studies Center, there is a colony of Colobopsis explodens ants, and they are very protective of their nest.
These ants take good care of their herds and will fight fiercely to protect them.
When they are treated, only about 10 percent of the ants die from infection, compared to 80 percent of the untreated.
Beneficial interactions between ants and hemipterans occur extensively in many ecosystems (Helms and Vinson, 2002; Holway et al., 2002; Simberloff, 2006; Brightwell and Silverman, 2010).
Currently, identifying ants found at inspection stations takes hours or even days, because samples are typically sent to a lab.
Flying ants, are more correctly defined as winged termites, who after the first rains, take to the air in their millions to propagate new colonies.