Annie Oakley

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Annie Oakley

A free ticket to an event. Alludes to US markswoman Annie Oakley's penchant for filling targets with bullet holes, likened to the holes punched in free tickets to prevent resale or reuse. Hey, my work gave me two Annie Oakleys to tonight's show—want to go with me? The seats aren't great, but hey, they're free!
References in classic literature ?
Little Annie, tell me why you weep," said a low voice in her ear; and, looking up, the child beheld a little figure standing on a vine-leaf at her side; a lovely face smiled on her, from amid bright locks of hair, and shining wings were folded on a white and glittering robe, that fluttered in the wind.
Yes, all these things I do, and many stranger still, that all your fairy books can never tell; but now, dear Annie," said the Fairy, bending nearer, "tell me why I found no sunshine on your face; why are these great drops shining on the flowers, and why do you sit alone when BIRD and BEE are calling you to play?
Ah, you will not love me any more if I should tell you all," said Annie, while the tears began to fall again; "I am not happy, for I am not good; how shall I learn to be a patient, gentle child?
So Peter Hovenden and his daughter Annie plodded on without further conversation, until in a by-street of the town they found themselves passing the open door of a blacksmith's shop.
Pray don't speak so loud, father," whispered Annie, "Robert Danforth will hear you.
But we must return to Owen Warland's shop, and spend more meditation upon his history and character than either Peter Hovenden, or probably his daughter Annie, or Owen's old school-fellow, Robert Danforth, would have thought due to so slight a subject.
But my heart it is brighter Than all of the many Stars in the sky, For it sparkles with Annie -- It glows with the light Of the love of my Annie -- With the thought of the light Of the eyes of my Annie.
My cousin Annie did say, when we talked of it, that she liked to have her friends within reach rather than to have them banished, and the old Doctor -'
I don't want to look a gift-horse in the mouth, which is not a gracious thing to do; otherwise, I dare say, my cousin Annie could easily arrange it in her own way.
You said the other day that you'd be perfectly happy if you could only go to Annie Moffat's," observed Beth in her quiet way.
The more she saw of Annie Moffat's pretty things, the more she envied her and sighed to be rich.
An audible creaking proclaimed the approach of Annie, so I had no time to reply.
I sent for you, Annie, because I thought you might be able to tell me something about the letters Mrs.
Ut will be all night un, an' I wull be wuth you, Annie, an' the sea can go tull hell.
Annie leaned toward him, and as the train stopped they kissed each other across the sleeping child.