old story

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old story

Something that is not new or happens repeatedly. A CEO of a financial firm found guilty of fraud? It's an old story at this point. They always think they'll get away with it, too. Oh yeah, his crappy behavior when he's been drinking is an old story. We all just tend to avoid going out to bars with him.
See also: old, story

old story, an

A common occurrence or excuse. For example, Karen's mood swings are an old story. [c. 1700] Also see same old story.
See also: old
References in classic literature ?
But though it was now an old story, and the most aged people had almost forgotten that such a vessel had been wrecked, William Phips resolved that the sunken treasure should again be brought to light.
THERE'S an old story for children that says the elephant got its trunk when a crocodile tried to pull it into a river by its nose.
BBC1, 9.00pm Anne Reid (below) is keen to find out about her father's family, but only has a couple of clues to go on - the name of a house in Scotland and an old story that his ancestors were ministers in the church.
In essence, you're moving from an old story to a new story.
1 : an old story that is widely believed but cannot be proved to be true
When asked whether he saw 2008 as the start of a new adventure with Renault, or like picking up an old story for another chapter, he replied: "I think both are true.
It is a bold retelling of an old story which has many high points, even if it doesn't always hit the mark as squarely as it might.
For the people of Israel, living in exile in Babylon, the events of the Exodus are an old story of bygone days.
The fact that this is an old story. He read my mind!
Sounds like an old story, but there's a new twist: Section 404, Sarbanes-Oxley's guidance for managing internal controls, is fueling the fire.
"No matter how eccentric Michael Jackson is, no matter how self-serving his charges might seem, he is reviving an old story, full of exploited figures, that is still very much alive," Crouch observes.
The most the rest of us can hope for is to either tell a new story with old tools and words, or an old story with new tools and new words.
Lisa Silverman offers a new cut at an old story: the end of torture and the advent of a less cruel penology.
``I think it is an old story to talk about right now because there's been so much already said about it.''