American

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Related to Americanness: American Express

American as apple pie

Exemplary or indicative of American life, interests, or ideals (often stereotypically so). Baseball is as American as apple pie.
See also: American, apple, pie

the American Dream

1. The belief that anyone can succeed (often with an emphasis on material gain) through hard work. The American Dream feels less attainable the more I am crushed by student loans.
2. The achievement of wealth and success. After years of hard work, we finally have a big house and successful careers. We're living the American Dream.
See also: American, dream

be as American as apple pie

To be exemplary or indicative of American life, interests, or ideals (often stereotypically so). Baseball is as American as apple pie.
See also: American, apple, pie

as American as mom and apple pie

Considered a core principle, value, belief, belief, characteristic, aspect, etc., of the United States of America or its citizens. Sometimes used sarcastically or ironically. A: "I've never really liked baseball." B: "Really? But it's as American as mom and apple pie!" It doesn't surprise me at all that their tax overhaul would turn out this ridiculous—after all, convoluted taxes are as American as mom and apple pie.
See also: American, and, apple, mom, pie

as American as motherhood and apple pie

Considered a core principle, value, belief, belief, characteristic, aspect, etc., of the United States of America or its citizens. Sometimes used sarcastically or ironically. A: "I've never really liked baseball." B: "Really? But it's as American as motherhood and apple pie!" It doesn't surprise me at all that their tax overhaul would turn out this ridiculous—after all, convoluted taxes are as American as motherhood and apple pie.

*American as apple pie

Cliché quintessential American. (*Also: as ~.) A small house with a white picket fence is supposed to be as American as apple pie.
See also: American, apple, pie

American dream

the idealistic notion that Americans are preoccupied with obtaining certain materialistic goals. The American dream of home ownership, a car in the garage, and a chicken in every pot started in the early thirties.
See also: American, dream

American as apple pie

If something or someone is as American as apple pie, they are typical of the American way of life. Jeans are as American as apple pie and old jeans show a touch of class. Note: Apple pie is a traditional dessert that is thought of as typically American.
See also: American, apple, pie

the American dream

COMMON The American dream is the idea that anybody can be successful in life, even if they are born poor. Part of the American dream is building a new business that creates jobs and financial independence.
See also: American, dream

as American as apple pie

typically American in character.
1995 New York Times Magazine To reward people for something beyond merit is American as apple pie.
See also: American, apple, pie

the American dream

the ideal by which equality of opportunity is available to any American, allowing the highest aspirations and goals to be achieved.
See also: American, dream

as Aˌmerican as apple ˈpie

used to say that something is typical of America: For me, baseball is as American as apple pie.
See also: American, apple, pie

Truth, justice, and the American Way

and TJATAW
phr. & comp. abb. a phrase said in response to impassioned declarations about almost anything. (This phrase was used to introduce the Superman radio and television programs.) Sure, Mom and apple pie, as well as TJATAW.
See also: American, and, way

American dream, the

The image of prosperity, achievable through hard work. A political cliché invoked by candidates, it was used by Alexis de Tocqueville in Democracy in America (1835) but may be even older. In 1975 psychoanalyst David Abrahansen was quoted as saying, “The American dream is in part responsible for a great deal of crime and violence, because people feel that the country owes them not only a living but a good living.” A similar cliché of even less precise definition is the American way, evoking an image of democracy, fairness, and other desirable traits.
See also: American
References in periodicals archive ?
A preliminary factor must be taken into account: there is no single version of Americanness in these novels.
119-22) is an accomplished example of close reading and innovative illustration of the value of this short-story toward an appreciation of the conflicted views held by Hebraists as regarding Americanness.
This constant quest to articulate un-Americanness as something distinctly separate from Americanness, leads post-9/11 U.S.
In Auerbach's dexterous reversal, the lynchpin of Americanness is swapped out for Un-Americanness.
But his Americanness is basic, coming straight out of the author's lived--and inherited--history.
The last point, the critique of exploitative practices, interweaves with the critique of Americanness, that is, the American way of living and the United States as a country.
An issue related to textual aesthetics and the afore-mentioned question of the audience's linguistic knowledge of English is the 'Americanness', or US specificity, of Sex and the City.
Overall, there was uncertainty as to the status and position of the foreign-born immigrants in American society, and Bric provides us with an insight not only into how immigrants were perceived but also into the terms in which Americanness was being defined during this period.
He noted what he called his growing "Americanness," but spent the next several years trying to bring reconciliation to the British and their colonists through his published articles.
In "Slavery's Ruins and the Countermonumental Impulse" (Chapter 4), as Luciano brings major nineteenth-century figures into conversation with each other not only on the ground of their agreement with, but also in terms of their opposition to, the relations between the individuality and sexuality of the citizen-subject and the familial as well as the monumental rubrics of Americanness, we find ourselves immersed in a penetrating discussion of the two sides of the politics of sentiment.
It is one of the true glories of our country that, when it comes to Americanness, you don't have to be a descendant of the Founders or the colonists who came over on the Mayflower.
The strength of the work, the thing that makes it of such moment, is the heterogeneous and fluid notion of Americanness which is at the heart of the project and which is brought out in a collective reading of the poetry.
Reed traded in Americanness. For teens starved of an authentic native youth culture who were looking enviously west, that was, initially anyway, a mark of authenticity.
Randall argues that the two main issues in the opera's reception were "Americanness" and the message of redemption in its "happy ending": each theme is taken up in a chapter of its own.
Nolt's findings that Germans generally avoided evangelicalism because of its association with Americanness: German-speaking Moravian society members protected their German identity less vigorously and integrated more quickly than did German Lutheran or Reformed immigrants.