amendment

(redirected from Amendments)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial, Encyclopedia.
Related to Amendments: Bill of Rights

plead the Fifth (Amendment)

1. To refuse to testify against oneself in court, in accordance with the rights guaranteed by the Fifth Amendment to the United States Constitution. The alleged kingpin of the east coast drug cartel simply pled the Fifth after every question the prosecution put to him.
2. By extension, to refuse to answer a question or provide information, especially if doing so may incriminate or embarrass oneself. Just plead the Fifth if your mom asks where you've been all night! A: "So, I hear things got pretty messy at the bar last night." B: "Yeah, I'm going to have to plead the Fifth Amendment on that one!"
See also: fifth, plead

lame duck

1. Someone or something that needs help. The company started as a lame duck that was saved by an innovative entrepreneur who decided to take some risks and go in a new direction.
2. An elected official serving their last term in office, usually so-called after a successor has been elected. The opposing party was angry at the president's intention to name a Supreme Court replacement while he was a lame duck.
See also: duck, lame

take the fifth (amendment)

1. To refuse to testify against oneself in court, in accordance with the right guaranteed by the Fifth Amendment to the United States Constitution, part of the Bill of Rights. The defendant took the fifth after every question the prosecution put to him. There is speculation that he will take the fifth amendment if he is asked about his actions under oath.
2. By extension, to refuse to answer a question or provide information, especially if doing so may incriminate or embarrass oneself. Just take the fifth if your mom asks where you've been all night! A: "So, I hear things got pretty messy at the party last night." B: "Yeah, I'm going to have to take the fifth amendment on that one!"
See also: fifth, take

lame duck

 
1. Fig. someone who is in the last period of a term in an elective office and cannot run for reelection. You can't expect much from a lame duck. As a lame duck, there's not a lot I can do.
2. Fig. having to do with someone in the last period of a term in an elective office. (Used as an adjective; sometimes lame-duck.) You don't expect much from a lame-duck president. Lame-duck Congresses tend to do things they wouldn't dare do otherwise.
See also: duck, lame

lame duck

An elected officeholder whose term of office has not yet expired but who has failed to be re-elected and therefore cannot garner much political support for initiatives. For example, You can't expect a lame duck President to get much accomplished; he's only got a month left in office . This expression originated in the 1700s and then meant a stockbroker who did not meet his debts. It was transferred to officeholders in the 1860s. The Lame Duck Amendment, 20th to the U.S. Constitution, calls for Congress and each new President to take office in January instead of March (as before), thereby eliminating the lame-duck session of Congress.
See also: duck, lame

lame duck

a person or thing that is powerless or in need of help. informal
In the mid 18th century, lame duck was used in a stock-market context, with reference to a person or company that could not fulfil their financial obligations. Later, from the mid 19th century, it was used specifically with reference to US politicians in the final period of office, after the election of their successor.
1998 Spectator At some point in his second and final term, every president becomes a lame duck: as the man himself matters less, so does the office.
See also: duck, lame

lame duck

1. n. someone who is in the last period of a term in an elective office. You can’t expect much from a lame duck.
2. mod. having to do with someone in the last period of a term in an elective office. You don’t expect much from a lame duck president.
See also: duck, lame
References in periodicals archive ?
Karia Munda, eight-time BJP Lok Sabha MP from Khuti and a tribal leader, said: "The amendments are not in the interest of the state.
The House passed the resolution to make the 14th Amendment part of the Constitution, and the Senate did too, though the latter made revisions, cutting some of Stevens' more extreme planks.
Though he kept his word to the anti-Federalists, Madison actually thought that the amendments were "unnecessary and dangerous.
It took some prodding from reporters to get Bush to discuss the marriage amendment.
Elton Gallegly, R-Thousand Oaks, and Dana Rorhabacher, R-Huntington Beach, were among the Republicans who voted in favor of Sherman's amendment.
Other state courts have indicated that they, too, will read their Blaine amendments as prohibiting aid to religious schools, regardless of whether the aid is given directly by the state or indirectly through parents and students.
Nevertheless, Martinez filed a civil suit under Section 1983, claiming that the interrogation of him violated both his Fifth Amendment right against compelled self-incrimination and his Fourteenth Amendment due process rights.
If the disqualifying provision is a plan provision that is integral to a qualification requirement that was changed, the remedial amendment period begins on the first day on which the plan operated in accordance with such plan provision, as amended.
of Health, Education and Welfare issues regulations based on Moss amendments.
The Amendments expand options for consumer choice in several ways.
Now they're attempting to chip away affirmative action provisions by attaching an endless stream of amendments to reauthorization bills.
Unfortunatenly, complexity of tax law requires that amendments be facilitated more frequently than just once a year in the budget.
The Rehabilitation Act Amendments of 1992, themselves recently amended by 1993 statutory changes, mark the first major revision of federal-state vocational rehabilitation program and the other provisions of the Rehabilitation Act since the passage of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990.