amendment

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Related to Amendments: Bill of Rights

plead the Fifth (Amendment)

1. To refuse to testify against oneself in court, in accordance with the rights guaranteed by the Fifth Amendment to the United States Constitution. The alleged kingpin of the east coast drug cartel simply pled the Fifth after every question the prosecution put to him.
2. By extension, to refuse to answer a question or provide information, especially if doing so may incriminate or embarrass oneself. Just plead the Fifth if your mom asks where you've been all night! A: "So, I hear things got pretty messy at the bar last night." B: "Yeah, I'm going to have to plead the Fifth Amendment on that one!"
See also: fifth, plead

lame duck

1. Someone or something that needs help. The company started as a lame duck that was saved by an innovative entrepreneur who decided to take some risks and go in a new direction.
2. An elected official serving their last term in office, usually so-called after a successor has been elected. The opposing party was angry at the president's intention to name a Supreme Court replacement while he was a lame duck.
See also: duck, lame

take the fifth (amendment)

1. To refuse to testify against oneself in court, in accordance with the right guaranteed by the Fifth Amendment to the United States Constitution, part of the Bill of Rights. The defendant took the fifth after every question the prosecution put to him. There is speculation that he will take the fifth amendment if he is asked about his actions under oath.
2. By extension, to refuse to answer a question or provide information, especially if doing so may incriminate or embarrass oneself. Just take the fifth if your mom asks where you've been all night! A: "So, I hear things got pretty messy at the party last night." B: "Yeah, I'm going to have to take the fifth amendment on that one!"
See also: fifth, take

lame duck

 
1. Fig. someone who is in the last period of a term in an elective office and cannot run for reelection. You can't expect much from a lame duck. As a lame duck, there's not a lot I can do.
2. Fig. having to do with someone in the last period of a term in an elective office. (Used as an adjective; sometimes lame-duck.) You don't expect much from a lame-duck president. Lame-duck Congresses tend to do things they wouldn't dare do otherwise.
See also: duck, lame

lame duck

An elected officeholder whose term of office has not yet expired but who has failed to be re-elected and therefore cannot garner much political support for initiatives. For example, You can't expect a lame duck President to get much accomplished; he's only got a month left in office . This expression originated in the 1700s and then meant a stockbroker who did not meet his debts. It was transferred to officeholders in the 1860s. The Lame Duck Amendment, 20th to the U.S. Constitution, calls for Congress and each new President to take office in January instead of March (as before), thereby eliminating the lame-duck session of Congress.
See also: duck, lame

lame duck

a person or thing that is powerless or in need of help. informal
In the mid 18th century, lame duck was used in a stock-market context, with reference to a person or company that could not fulfil their financial obligations. Later, from the mid 19th century, it was used specifically with reference to US politicians in the final period of office, after the election of their successor.
1998 Spectator At some point in his second and final term, every president becomes a lame duck: as the man himself matters less, so does the office.
See also: duck, lame

lame duck

1. n. someone who is in the last period of a term in an elective office. You can’t expect much from a lame duck.
2. mod. having to do with someone in the last period of a term in an elective office. You don’t expect much from a lame duck president.
See also: duck, lame
References in periodicals archive ?
The House also passed a motion under Rule 126 (7) to consider the Oil and Gas Regulatory Authority (Amendment) Bill, 2017 in joint sitting.
Recto explained that senators and congressmen could help allocate funds for projects in their hometown but these amendments in the national budget could still be vetoed by the President.
The Division of Revenue (Amendment) Bill, 2018 (Sen.
At the last committee meeting, Mr Umar had said that State Minister for Interior Talal Chaudhry had endorsed the bill as well, but the minister did not agree with amendments to sections 95, 96, 97 and 98 of the act.
Committee members were told that so far around 1,400 citizen-proposed amendments have been submitted.
"The amendments bills should have been brought keeping the interests of the tribal people in mind.
The Turkish Constitutional Court has been criticized for venturing beyond this pure procedural review of formal amendments, despite what appears to be a clear prohibition against a broader review of the substance of secularism.
Even many Republicans shrank back from supporting this amendment. Congressman and New York Times publisher Henry Raymond accused Stevens of designing the amendment so that Southern states could not adopt it.
In 2004, Republicans rushed thirteen amendments onto state ballots to coincide with the Presidential election.
(1884), Field worked to enhance judicial power, nullify popular legislation, and expand individual liberty under the 14th Amendment.
The Federal Reserve Board announced on April 19, 2005, amendments to appendix A of Regulation CC (Availability of Funds and Collection of Checks) that reflect the restructuring of the Federal Reserve's check-processing operations in the Tenth and Twelfth Districts.
Throughout 2004, James Dobson of Focus on the Family, TV preacher Jerry Falwell and a host of other Religious Right honchos, working in a coalition called the Arlington Group, led the drive for passage of anti-gay constitutional amendments. The Arlington group, not surprisingly, was ticked off at the president's comments aboard Air Force One and quickly fired off a letter to Bush's top political adviser Karl Rove.
There should be no place in our Constitution for negative amendments, such as the one Bush proposes, which will put discrimination into that sacred document."
The Canadian Department of Finance released a revised package of technical amendments on February 27, 2004.