Alibi Ike


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Alibi Ike

Someone who constantly makes excuses, so as to shirk duty or responsibility. The name was featured in the 1920s short story "Alibi Ike." A: "Sorry, Mom, I can't do the dishes tonight—I have a baseball game and then homework and also a project that's due tomorrow." B: "Listen, Alibi Ike, I think you can squeeze in washing a few dishes."
References in periodicals archive ?
Brown's Elmer, the Great (1933) and Alibi Ike (1935), the Grover Cleveland Alexander biopic The Winning Team (1952), the Dizzy Dean biopic The Pride of St.
baseball comedies, Fireman, Save My Child (1932), Elmer the Great (1933), and Alibi Ike (1935)--regularly formed their own teams and sought out competition.
Three of them--Fireman, Save My Child (1932), Elmer the Great (1933), and Alibi Ike (1935)--featured Joe E.
Frank Shellenback had a supporting role in Fireman, Save My Child; Shellenback and a roster full of ballplayers (Herman "Hi" Bell, Guy Cantrell, Dick Cox, Cedric Durst, Ray French, Mike Gazella, Wally Hebert, Wally Hood, Don Hurst, Smead Jolley, Lou Koupal, Wes Kingdon, Jim Levey, Bob Meusel, Wally Rehg, Jim Thorpe, and Ed Wells) appear as big leaguers in Alibi Ike.
More entertaining are two features starring comic Charles Ray--"The Pinch Hitter" (1917) and "The Busher" (1919)--both of which chronicle a country innocent as ballplayer, a character which would frequently surface in later baseball pictures, from Brown's Alibi Ike to Robert Redford's Roy Hobbs ("The Natural" 1984).
He got to wear a Chicago Cubs warm-up jacket on-screen in Alibi Ike (1935), playing "Cap," the Cubbies manager, and Yankee pinstripes in Safe at Home