aim

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Related to AIMES: AIIMS

aim at

1. To point or guide an object, such as a weapon, at a target. Make sure you aim at the target before you pull the trigger. His water balloon is aimed at you! Run!
2. To target a particular issue or goal. The new program is aimed at helping struggling students get the tutoring they need to succeed in class.
3. To direct something at a specific person or group. I could tell that his rude remarks were aimed at me even though he did not mention my name. The studio's ad campaign is aiming at teenagers, but I think the movie is too violent for a young audience.
See also: aim

aim for

1. To point or guide an object, such as a weapon, at a target. Make sure you aim for the target before you pull the trigger. His water balloon is aimed for you! Run!
2. To strive to accomplish a particular goal. After studying all weekend, Amanda is aiming for a perfect score on her history exam.
See also: aim

aim for the stars

Don't limit yourself—aspire to achieve greatness, even if it seems impossible or impractical. When choosing a career path, don't settle—aim for the stars!
See also: aim, star

aim to

To strive or plan to do something. I aim to be the best customer service representative I can be. I'm aiming to win Holly's heart—she is just the prettiest girl in the whole town.
See also: aim

reach for the sky

1. To set one's goals or ambitions very high; to try to attain or achieve something particularly difficult. My parents always taught me to reach for the sky when I was growing up—that I could be anything I set my mind to! With all that money, you could do whatever you want. Reach for the sky, kiddo!
2. A command for one to put one's hands up in a show of surrender, as during a robbery or an arrest. Reach for the sky, MacAfee, we've got you surrounded!
See also: reach, sky

take aim (at someone or something

1. To aim one's projectile weapon at someone or something. The sniper took aim and fired off a single shot, killing the suspect instantly. He had just begun to take aim at the deer when the sound of a car horn scared it away.
2. To direct severe criticism or scorn at someone or something. The president took aim at the Russian president during her speech. You really need to double-check your sources before you take aim like that in the future.
See also: aim, someone, something, take

aim for the sky

To set one's goals or ambitions very high; to try to attain or achieve something particularly difficult. My parents always taught me to aim for the sky when I was growing up—that I could be anything I set my mind to! With all that money, you could do whatever you want. Aim for the sky, kiddo!
See also: aim, sky

aim to (do something)

To intend, plan, or mean to do something. I didn't aim to offend him, but judging by the look on his face, I must have.
See also: aim

aim for something

 and aim at something
to strive toward a particular goal; to direct oneself or one's energies toward something. You should aim for success. Aim at getting this done on time.
See also: aim

Aim for the stars!

 and Reach for the stars!
Aspire to something!; Set one's goals high! Aim for the stars, son! Don't settle for second best. Set your sights high. Reach for the stars!
See also: aim

aim something at someone or something

to point or direct something at someone or something. Wally aimed the hose at Sarah and tried to soak her.
See also: aim

aim to do something

Rur. to intend to do something. I didn't aim to hurt your feelings, sugar, you know I didn't.
See also: aim

reach for the sky

 
1. and aim for the sky; shoot for the sky Fig. to set one's sights high. Reach for the sky! Go for it! You should always reach for the sky, but be prepared for not attaining your goals every time.
2. Fig. Inf. to put one's hands up, as in a burglary. The gunman told the bank teller to reach for the sky. Reach for the sky and give me all your money!
See also: reach, sky

take aim at someone or something

Fig. to prepare to deal with someone or something; to focus on someone or something. (Based on take aim (at someone, something, or an animal).) Now we have to take aim at the problem and try to get it solved. The critics took aim at the star of the musical and tore her to pieces.
See also: aim, take

take aim (at someone, something, or an animal)

to aim [something] at someone, something, or an animal. The hunter took aim at the deer and pulled the trigger. You must take aim carefully before you shoot.
See also: aim, take

We aim to please.

Fig. We try hard to please you. (Usually a commercial slogan, but can be said in jest by one person, often in response to Thank you.) Mary: This meal is absolutely delicious! Waiter: We aim to please. Tom: Well, Sue, here's the laundry detergent you wanted from the store. Sue: Oh, thanks loads. You saved me a trip. Tom: We aim to please.
See also: aim, please, we

aim to

Try or intend to do something, as in We aim to please, or She aims to fly to California. This term derives from aim in the sense of "direct the course of something," such as an arrow or bullet. [Colloquial; c. 1600]
See also: aim

reach for the sky

1. Set very high goals, aspire to the best, as in I'm sure they'll make you a partner, so reach for the sky. The sky here stands for high aspirations. Also see sky's the limit.
2. Put your hands up high, as in One robber held the teller at gunpoint, shouting " Reach for the sky!" This usage is always put as an imperative. [Slang; mid-1900s]
See also: reach, sky

take aim

Direct a missile or criticism at something or someone, as in Raising his rifle, Chet took aim at the squirrel but missed it entirely, or In his last speech the President took aim at the opposition leader. [Late 1500s]
See also: aim, take

reach for the sky

If you reach for the sky, you are ambitious and try hard to achieve something very difficult. You have inspired our students and helped them to reach for the sky.
See also: reach, sky

take ˈaim at somebody/something

(American English) direct your criticism at or your attention to somebody/something: The unions are taking aim at the government.Several retail giants have now decided to take aim at the youth market.
See also: aim, somebody, something, take

aim at

v.
1. To point or direct something at someone or something: The archers drew back their arrows and aimed at the target.
2. To intend something for some purpose. Often used in the passive: We aimed our discussion at a solution to the financial problems. The new computer classes are aimed at teaching how computers work.
3. To be intended to achieve something: This new program aims at raising awareness about privacy issues.
4. To do or say something intended to affect someone or something. Used chiefly in the passive: Their sarcasm was aimed directly at me. The antismoking campaign was aimed at teenagers.
See also: aim

aim for the sky

and reach for the sky and shoot for the sky
in. to aspire to something; to set one’s goals high. (See a different sense at reach for the sky.) Shoot for the sky, son. Don’t settle for second best. Don’t settle for less. Reach for the sky!
See also: aim, sky

reach for the sky

verb
See also: reach, sky

reach for the sky

1. Go to aim for the sky.
2. in. (a command) to put one’s hands up, as in a robbery. The bank teller reached for the sky without having to be told.
See also: reach, sky

take aim

1. To aim a weapon or object to be propelled.
2. To direct criticism or one's attention at something.
See also: aim, take
References in periodicals archive ?
Exhibit 2, below, shows the AIMES indicators for 1997 to 1999, aggregated for the entire organization.
The initial response within CCF to the AIMES approach has been very positive.
Lyn Thompson, a sister in the emergency department, said of Aimes's conviction: "This is a very good outcome for both the nurse involved and the hospital as a whole.
Fibrenet will have a capacity of 10 gigabytes per second and, according to AIMES, could save businesses up to 80% of the typical cost of a much slower 10 megabyte broadband service.
Prof Dennis Kehoe, chief executive of AIMES, said: "At the moment, the health informatics community is in a vicious circle.
"It's well known that national funding competitions of this kind attract a deluge of applications, and to come through this process successfully is an endorsement of the technical expertise and facilities we're developing here at AIMES."
Prof Dennis Kehoe, chief executive of AIMES, said: "The improved service we've offered Park demonstrates how virtualisation and cloud computing technologies are transforming the way in which IT services, such as disaster recovery, are delivered by providing a faster and more cost effective approach."
"The four-hour solution that AIMES has provided us with is both better suited to our needs and less expensive, making it far more costeffective."
AIMES's portfolio of services includes secure data hosting, data back-up and disaster recovery solutions.
Aimes, a community interest company based on Liverpool Innovation Park, was set up in 2002 to exploit business opportunities arising from seeing the internet as a platform for services.
The deal with Sysco will see Aimes deliver a real-time replication and "failover" service - which means if Sysco's on-site servers fail, virtual servers within Aimes's data centre automatically take over, ensuring there is no interruption in service for Sysco's clients and staff.
Aimes, which was last week named as Knowledge Business of the Year at the Liverpool Daily Post Regional Business Awards, provides secure server hosting, data back-up and disaster recovery services in energy efficient facilities.
TO FIND out more about the project and to register, go to www.i-techpartner.eu or call Marie Mitchell at AIMES on 0151 795 0116.
Set up in 2003 by the University of Liverpool and funded by Objective 1, NWDA and City Focus, AIMES is helping businesses to improve their performance by exploiting the commercial benefits of utility computing.
A new research centre for the AIMES project will be ready in 2004, bringing together 70 staff from development teams.