fairy tale

(redirected from A Fairy Tale)
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fairy tale

1. noun A lie or fabricated account of something (likened to a clearly fictional fantasy story). I know he's telling me fairy tales to avoid admitting his mistakes.
2. adjective Resembling a fantasy story, especially due to being entirely positive or happy or having a happy ending. In this usage, the phrase is usually hyphenated. I really want a fairy-tale wedding, complete with a beautiful gown and a fancy cake. It wasn't some fairy-tale marrage, you know. We had our problems.
See also: fairy, tale

fairy tale

and bedtime story
n. a simplistic and condescending explanation for something; a lie. I don’t want to hear a fairy tale, just the facts, ma’am. I’ve already heard your little bedtime story. You’ll have to do better than that!
See also: fairy, tale
References in classic literature ?
"Now drink your tea," said the boy's mother; "then, perhaps, you may hear a fairy tale."
"My mother says that all you look at can be turned into a fairy tale: and that you can find a story in everything."
"Yes, if a fairy tale would come of its own accord; but they are proud and haughty, and come only when they choose.
"You have had a good sleep while I have been sitting here, and arguing with him whether it was a story or a fairy tale."
It's a fairy tale, you know, and anything can happen in a fairy tale."
Finding the perfect wedding venue can be the hardest part of planning your big day, and there is a fairy tale location right here on Merseyside you might not be familiar with.
While it is possible to match up dramatis personae with specific characters in a fairy tale, Propp also allows for one character to be "involved in several spheres of action" or for "a single sphere of action [to be] distributed among several characters" (80-81).
Following Abbruscato's rallying introduction, Carys Crossen examines the stakes in reading David Almond's Skellig as a work of magical realism, a fairy tale, or a Gothic text.
He was born 1805 under poor circumstances in Odense, a small city in the middle of Denmark, and the story about how his dreams came through is interpreted as a fairy tale by himself in his autobiography, The Fairy Tale of my Life (Mit livs eventyr) (1855).
This is not a fairy tale because it is the last day of the year and there is not, and never will be a fairy tale as beautiful as our memories of the last year, or as beautiful as our dreams and hopes for the year that is about to begin.
There is no clear scholarly definition of a fairy tale because they belong to a wider body of literature, folk tales.
For instance, at the end of Lola, the reunion of the showgirl (Lola) with her lover (Michel), after seven years of waiting, may hint at the happy ending of a fairy tale; but the film's emphasis on the abject sadness suffered by Roland, who also loves Lola and is devastated at losing her, points also to a melodramatic disillusionment.
The book includes a fairy tale teleography, in addition to numerous essays by over twenty contributors.
All have been trained to closely interact with the children, who can choose a fairy tale outfit to dress up in on arrival, or arrive as their own favourite character.
In a bid to increase tourism to the region bosses at the attraction have transformed their picturesque landscape into a fairy tale adventure inspired by Grimm's childhood favourites.