11


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(a) quarter of (a given hour in time)

A quarter of an hour (15 minutes) before the named hour in time (e.g., "quarter of six" would mean 5:45). Primarily heard in US. A: "What time does the movie start?" B: "Not until a quarter of eight, so we've got plenty of time!" I thought I'd be home already, but with this traffic, it'll be quarter of before I'm back.
See also: given, hour, of, quarter

at the tender age of

At the young age of. This phrase is used to emphasize how young one was when one did something in particular. The age is stated after "of." I'm not surprised to hear that he was doing science experiments at the tender age of seven—he's a child genius!
See also: age, of, tender

film at 11

cliché Primarily heard in US.
1. A phrase used in broadcast journalism during clips of news stories that are to be featured in greater detail later (when a news program airs, traditionally at 11 PM) Coming up tonight—doctors who let their pets perform surgery. Film at 11.
2. Used by extension to indicate something not at all newsworthy. A: "Don't you think that's interesting?" B: "No, not really. 'Local boy discovers big pit in a field. Film at 11.'"
See also: 11, film

more at 11

cliché Primarily heard in US.
1. Formerly used by television news broadcasters to advertise the fact that footage of a breaking news story would be shown during the 11 PM local news slot. Coming up tonight—doctors who let their pets perform surgery? More at 11.
2. Used by extension to indicate something not at all newsworthy. A: "Don't you think that's interesting?" B: "No, not really. 'Local boy discovers big pit in a field. More at 11.'"
See also: 11, more

quarter past (a given hour in time)

A quarter of an hour (15 minutes) after the named hour in time. A: "What time does the movie start?" B: "Not until a quarter past eight, so we've got plenty of time!" I thought I'd be home already, but with this traffic, it'll be quarter past before I'm back.
See also: given, hour, past, quarter

up to eleven

To an intense, excessive, or extreme degree; at or beyond the maximum amount or normal threshold. (Coined in the 1984 comedy film This is Spinal Tap, referring to the guitar player's amplifier going to eleven, as opposed to the traditional limit of ten.) Some of the best nights we had when we were teenagers were spent just driving aimlessly, cranking the car stereo up to eleven. Whenever our parents' fighting got up to eleven, my sister and I made ourselves scarce.
See also: eleven, up
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.
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