(with) might and main

(with) might and main

With as much effort or strength as one can muster. She attacked that punching bag with might and main. If you're not happy in your current job, then you should be working might and main to find a new one.
See also: and, main, might

might and main

Cliché great physical strength; great force. The huge warrior, with all his might and main, could not break his way through the castle gates. The incredible might and main of the sea crushed the ship against the cliff.
See also: and, main, might

might and main, with

Strenuously, vigorously, as in She pulled on the rope with all her might and main. This expression is redundant, since the noun main also means "strength" or "power." It survives only in this phrase, which may also be dying out. [Late 1200s]
See also: and, might

with might and main

with all your force.
Main derives from the Old English word mægen meaning ‘physical strength’ (see also by main force at main). The use of the two nouns might and main together dates from the mid 15th century; main in this sense is no longer used in modern English except in this phrase.
See also: and, main, might