(there's) no rest for the weary

(there's) no rest for the weary

One must continue to toil or work regardless of how exhausted one is. A logical variant of the original phrase "no peace for the wicked." Parents of young children know all too well what it's like to have only a few hours of sleep and still have to get up at the crack of dawn—no rest for the weary, as my granny always said. There won't be time for a break, because we'll need to get going on the next phase of the project as soon as this one is done. There's no rest for the weary!
See also: for, no, rest, weary
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

There is no rest for the weary.

Prov. Even people who are worn-out must continue to work. (Describes a situation in which a tired person has to do more work.) By the time I finished doing the laundry, it was so late I had to begin cooking supper for the family. There is no rest for the weary.
See also: for, no, rest, there, weary
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

no rest for the weary (wicked)

No peace and quiet for anyone; to be kept very busy. This term, dating from about 1900, today is used facetiously by or about a person who simply is kept very busy. It presumably echoes several biblical passages stating that God will take care of good people but will provide no peace for evildoers (Isaiah 48:22 and 57:21). Wicked is used more in Britain, weary in America. After a two-foot snowfall and predictions of at least another foot of snow, meteorologist Michael Henry said, “There’s no rest for the weary. Just when they . . . cleaned up after the last storm, here comes another” (Boston Globe, March 9, 2001).
See also: for, no, rest, weary
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
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