(as) fresh as a daisy

(as) fresh as a daisy

1. Eager and enthusiastic, typically after some refreshing activity. After getting some sleep, I was as fresh as a daisy. Now that I've showered, I'm fresh as a daisy!
2. Very clean and tidy or well-kept. A new coat of paint will have this place looking as fresh as a daisy.
See also: daisy, fresh

*fresh as a daisy

Cliché very fresh; [of a person] always alert and ready to go. (*Also: as ~.) How can you be fresh as a daisy so early in the morning? I always feel fresh as a daisy after a shower.
See also: daisy, fresh

fresh as a daisy

Well rested, energetic, as in I'm finally over my jet lag and feel fresh as a daisy. This simile may allude to the fact that a daisy's petals fold at night and open in the morning. [Late 1700s]
See also: daisy, fresh

fresh as a daisy

1. If someone is as fresh as a daisy, they are full of energy and not at all tired. Once you've done some stretching exercises, you will be as fresh as a daisy again.
2. If something is as fresh as a daisy, it is very fresh, clean and bright. Choose a Victorian-style bed and use linen to make it look as fresh as a daisy.
See also: daisy, fresh

fresh as a daisy

very bright and cheerful. informal
This expression alludes to a daisy reopening its petals in the early morning or to its welcome appearance in springtime. The freshness of daisies has been a literary commonplace since at least the late 14th century, when it was used by Chaucer.
See also: daisy, fresh

(as) fresh as a ˈdaisy

lively or clean and neat: Even when it’s so hot, she looks as fresh as a daisy. How does she do it?
See also: daisy, fresh

(as) fresh as a daisy

mod. someone who is always alert and ready to go. How can you be fresh as a daisy so early in the morning?
See also: daisy, fresh

fresh as a daisy

verb
See also: daisy, fresh

fresh as a daisy

Vigorous, well rested, full of energy. This simile has survived the much older fresh as a rose, used by Chaucer and seldom heard today. It dates from the late eighteenth or early nineteenth century. Dickens used it to perfection in The Cricket on the Hearth (1845): “She presently came bouncing back—the saying is as fresh as any daisy; I say fresher.” The daisy’s name comes from the Old English daeges eage, meaning “day’s eye,” which refers to the flower’s yellow disk. Like many flowers, daisies close their petals in the evening, concealing the disk, and reopen them in the morning; possibly the simile alludes to this characteristic.
See also: daisy, fresh