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Adam and Eve

slang To believe (something). The phrase comes from rhyming slang in which "Adam and Eve" rhymes with "believe." Primarily heard in UK. I can't Adam and Eve it—Bill and Sarah are finally getting married! Little Jimmy, a world-famous author. Cor, who'd have Adam and Eved it?
See also: Adam, and, eve

Adam and Eve, not Adam and Steve

A phrase that uses the Bible as the basis for discouraging homosexuality. I can't believe some people still make the argument "Adam and Eve, not Adam and Steve" in today's day and age.
See also: Adam, and, not

Eve's custom house

obsolete The vagina. The phrase refers to the Biblical Eve. Sir, Eve's custom house is closed. I am a lady, you know.
See also: custom, house

on the eve of (something)

Immediately prior to something; just before something. Sometimes literally meaning "on the evening before (something)." Militants attacked the embassy on the eve of the anniversary of the historic peace agreement. She got cold feet on the eve of her wedding and got on a plane to Europe.
See also: eve, of, on

Would you Adam and Eve it?

slang Would you believe it? The phrase comes from rhyming slang in which "Adam and Eve" rhymes with "believe." Primarily heard in UK. Would you Adam and Eve it? Bill and Sarah are finally getting married!
See also: Adam, and, eve
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

on the eve of something

Fig. just before something, possibly the evening before something. John decided to leave school on the eve of his graduation. The team held a party on the eve of the tournament.
See also: eve, of, on
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

on the eve of

Just prior to, as in On the eve of the conference the main speaker backed out. This expression uses eve, literally "the night before," more loosely. [Late 1700s]
See also: eve, of, on
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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