yours


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Related to yours: Yours sincerely

get (one's)

1. To receive the due punishment (for something) that one deserves. Don't worry about those stool pigeons, we'll make sure they get theirs when the time is right. She cheated off me during the test? Oh, she'll get hers, alright!
2. To become wealthy or financially successful. After growing up in poverty, Jim was determined to get his no matter what it took.
See also: get

I don't fancy yours (much)

Said by one man to another to indicate a woman he thinks is unattractive. Primarily heard in UK. I was mortified when Bob said, "I don't fancy yours much," as a young woman passed by us on the street.
See also: fancy

yours sincerely

A common closing of a letter. I hope that we can work together again soon. Yours sincerely, Victoria

be (one's) for the asking

To be available for one to easily obtain or achieve. With your famous parents, any job is yours for the asking. Some of us, though, actually have to apply for jobs.
See also: ask

be (one's) for the taking

To be available for one to easily obtain or achieve. With your famous parents, any job is yours for the taking. Some of us, though, actually have to apply for jobs. Our probable valedictorian has been pretty distracted lately, so I think the title is yours for the taking.
See also: taking

all yours

A phrase said when one gives or relinquishes something to someone. A: "Hey, is the bathroom free?" B: "Yep, it's all yours!"
See also: all

up yours

vulgar slang An expression of anger at someone. A: "Watch where you're going!" B: "Up yours, buddy!"
See also: up

you scratch my back and I'll scratch yours

You help me and I'll help you. Thanks for the file. Here’s your money—you scratch my back and I'll scratch yours, remember?
See also: and, back, scratch

yours truly

1. A phrase used as a complimentary close to a letter, similar to "sincerely." Yours truly, Jane
2. Me; I; myself. My boss claims credit for all these projects, but do you know who did all the work? Yours truly! Everybody is jumping on their bandwagon, but you can count out yours truly, because I'm loyal to my team.
See also: truly

What's yours?

What would you like to drink? Said by a bartender to a patron. Primarily heard in UK. Hey Martin, long time no see. What's yours?

you and yours

You and your family members or those with whom one has close relationships. At Ally Life Insurance, our goal is to provide peace of mind to you and yours, no matter what unexpected troubles life brings. We're wishing nothing but happiness and good fortune to you and yours this holiday season.
See also: and

yours ever

An old-fashioned phrase used as an affectionate close to a letter. I hope that we can see each other again soon. Yours ever, Jane
See also: ever

ever yours

An old-fashioned phrase used as an affectionate close to a letter. I hope that we can see each other again soon. Ever yours, Jane
See also: ever

yours faithfully

A formal phrase used as a complimentary close to a letter, similar to "sincerely." Yours faithfully, Jane

What's yours is mine, and what's mine is mine.

Prov. A humorous way of saying, "Everything belongs to me."; (A jocular variant of "What's yours is mine, and what's mine is yours," an expression of generosity.) I know you won't mind lending me your radio. After all, what's yours is mine, and what's mine is mine. The thief took his confederate's share of the money they had stolen, saying, "What's yours is mine, and what's mine is mine."
See also: and, mine

What'll it be?

 and Name your poison.; What'll you have?; What's yours?
Inf. What do you want to drink?; What do you want?; How can I serve you? (Typically said by a bartender or bar waiter or waitress.) Tom: What'll it be, friend? Bill: I'll just have a ginger ale, if you don't mind. Waitress: What'll you have? Bob: Nothing, thanks.

You scratch my back and I'll scratch yours.

Fig. You do a favor for me and I'll do a favor for you.; If you do something for me that I cannot do for myself, I will do something for you that you cannot do for yourself. I'll grab the box on the top shelf if you will creep under the table and pick up my pen. You scratch my back, and I'll scratch yours.
See also: and, back, scratch

yours truly

 
1. a closing phrase at the end of a letter, just before the signature. Yours truly, Tom Jones. Best wishes from yours truly, Bill Smith.
2. oneself; I; me. There's nobody here right now but yours truly. Everyone else got up and left the table leaving yours truly to pay the bill.
See also: truly

scratch someone's back

Do someone a favor in hopes that a favor will be returned. For example, I don't mind driving this time-she's scratched my back plenty of times. It also is put as you scratch my back and I'll scratch yours, as in If you do the laundry I'll do the cooking-you scratch my back and I'll scratch yours. This idiom was first recorded in 1704.
See also: back, scratch

up yours

A vulgar exclamation of contempt, as in So you think you can beat me? Well, up yours! This expression, a shortening of the even more vulgar stick it up your ass, is sometimes accompanied by an obscene gesture (see give the finger). [ Vulgar slang; mid-1900s]
See also: up

yours truly

1. A closing formula for a letter, as in It was signed "Yours truly, Mary Smith." [Late 1700s]
2. I, me, myself, as in Jane sends her love, as does yours truly. [Colloquial; mid-1800s]
See also: truly

you scratch my back and I'll scratch yours

or

I'll scratch your back if you'll scratch mine

People say you scratch my back and I'll scratch yours to describe the way that one person helps another because they know that person will help them in return. For men, commitments are based on common interest: I'll scratch your back if you'll scratch mine. Note: You can also talk about back-scratching, meaning help that one person gives to another so that they will be helped in return. There was a lot of mutual back-scratching between directors and executives. Note: This phrase is often used to show disapproval.
See also: and, back, scratch

get yours

be killed. informal euphemistic
See also: get

you scratch my back and I'll scratch yours

if you do me a favour, I will return it. proverb
See also: and, back, scratch

up yours!

an exclamation expressing contemptuous defiance or rejection of someone. vulgar slang
See also: up

you and yours

you together with your family and close friends.
1937 American Home So it's natural…to take good care of the home that gives you and yours this steadfast protection.
See also: and

it’s/they’re ˌall ˈyours

used when passing the responsibility for somebody/something or the use of something to another person: ‘There you are, Mr Brown,’ she said, taking him into the classroom full of children, ‘they’re all yours.’
See also: all

yours ˈever/ever ˈyours

sometimes used at the end of an informal letter, before you write your name
See also: ever

Yours faithfully

(British English, formal, written) used at the end of a formal letter before you sign your name, when you have addressed somebody as ‘Dear Sir/Dear Madam,’ etc. and not by their name

ˌyou scratch ˈmy back and ˌI’ll scratch ˈyours

(saying) used to say that if somebody helps you, you will help them, even if this is unfair to others ▶ ˈback-scratching noun: There is too much back-scratching in local politics in this town.
See also: and, back, scratch

Yours sincerely

(British English) (American English Sincerely (yours)) (formal, written) used at the end of a formal letter before you sign your name, when you have addressed somebody by their name

yours ˈtruly


1 (informal, often humorous) I/me: Steve came first, Robin second, and yours truly came last.And of course, all the sandwiches will be made by yours truly.
2 (Yours Truly) (American English, formal, written) used at the end of a formal letter before you sign your name
See also: truly

ˌup ˈyours!

(taboo, slang) an offensive way of being rude to somebody, for example because they have said something that makes you angry: ‘Go and cook me my dinner.’ ‘Oh, up yours! Do it yourself!’
See also: up

what’s ˈyours?

(informal) (said in a pub or bar) what would you like to drink?

ˌyou and ˈyours

(informal) you and your family: You must provide a safe future for you and yours.
See also: and

Up yours!

exclam. Go to hell!; Drop dead! (Usually objectionable.) I won’t do it! Up yours!
See also: up

What’s yours?

interrog. What (or which) do you want? (see also What’ll it be?.) “What’s yours?” said the bartender.

yours truly

n. me, the speaker or writer. If it was up to yours truly, there wouldn’t be any such problem.
See also: truly

yours truly

I, myself, or me: "Let me talk about a typical day in the life of yours truly" (Robert A. Spivey).
See also: truly

yours truly

I. For whatever reason of modesty (or false modesty) that prevented speakers or writers from using the first-person singular pronoun “I,” the “yours truly” convention was established. It came from the standard letter closing. It sounded mannered when it was first used in the 19th century and even more so now. Other equally stilted circumlocutions for “I” or “me” used in writing are “your reporter” (still found in alumni class notes) and “your correspondent.”
See also: truly
References in classic literature ?
I ran into the morning-room, and there was your unfortunate housekeeper on the sofa, with all the women servants about her, more dead than alive.
When we told her that the letter had been forwarded, under cover to your friend Mr.
Now, my dear Noel, neither my uncle nor I have any wish to intrude ourselves on your confidence.
You would have chuckled one moment and caught your breath the next, to see those two stout fellows swinging their sticks--each half as long again as the men were, and thick as their arm--and edging along sidewise, neither wishing to strike the first blow.
And if you'll come to me I swear I'll tan your hides for naught.
Harkee, if you will leave your tan-pots and come with me, as sure as my name is Robin Hood, you shan't want gold or fee.
I received your letter, asking for my help towards re-establishing in life a poor family in whom you are interested.
I cannot accept such presents after all your goodness to me.
I've been wondering if you'd think it impertinent if I asked you to tell me about your guardian.
Nothing will induce me," she said, firmly, "to live with you as your wife.
I am equally ignorant of what you mean when you speak of defending your good name.
Make any mistake in this, and it will be the worst day's work you ever did in your life.
One of them was to inquire if he knew your mother's address.
Has your uncle received any answer from Major Fitz-David?
Did your uncle say anything when he showed you the major's letter?