you think

you think

1. A question one uses at the end of a sentence to express uncertainty. We're not going to get into trouble—you think?
2. A sarcastic rhetorical question used as a retort when someone states the obvious. A: "Wow, I bet that fire is really hot." B: "You think?"
See also: think
References in classic literature ?
Speaking in popular and unphilosophical terms, we may say that the content of a thought is supposed to be something in your head when you think the thought, while the object is usually something in the outer world.
Dear Mr Clennam, I dare say you think little of having been a friend to me when I had no other (not that I have any other now, for I have made no new friends), but I think much of it, and I never can forget it.
That you will think of me (when you think of me at all), and of my true affection and devoted gratitude, always without change, as of your poor child,
Should you think all that pleasant enough if I forgave you?
I wanted to ask you, Mary-- don't you think that Mr.
And you think that I shall never try to make good anything, Mary.
It might be easy enough to say what you think if you could always be sure just what you DO think," said the Story Girl.
That's an awful waste of time," commented Dan, "but I guess you'll need to if you're always going to say what you think.
Do you think he's done something that we don't know about, and is lying doggo on account of the police?
How long do you think it'll be before he gets tired of a scrubby room in a scrubby hotel?
You think you're a match for the one, but against the other you're helpless?
And I was glad that I felt glad, for it shows I'm improving, don't you think, Marilla, when I can rejoice in Josie's success?
said Maggie, "how can you think I have such feelings?
Do you think the porter and the cook have no anecdotes, no experiences, no wonders for you?
Don't you think we had better endure the ills we have than fly to others?