yield

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Related to yields: Treasury Yields, dividend yields, Bond Yields

yield to pressure

To give into outside forces urging someone to do something. Sally wasn't even going to apply for that boring job, but she yielded to pressure from her mother and submitted her resume nonetheless.
See also: pressure, yield

yield the ghost

To die. Based on the idea that one's spirit leaves the body when one dies. More commonly expressed in the phrase "give up the ghost." Susie called me in tears when grandma yielded the ghost after her long illness. Well, if the mechanic can't work his magic this time, it looks like Marshall's car will finally yield the ghost.
See also: ghost, yield

yield someone or something (over) (to someone or something)

to give up someone or something to someone or something. (The over is typically used where the phrase is synonymous with hand over.) You must yield Tom over to his mother. Will you yield the right-of-way to the other driver, or not? Please yield the right-of-way to me.

yield someone or something up (to someone)

to give someone or something up to someone. He had to yield his daughter up to Claire. The judge required that Tom yield up his daughter to his ex-wife. Finally, he yielded up the money.
See also: up, yield

yield something to someone

 
1. . to give the right-of-way to someone. You must yield the right-of-way to pedestrians. You failed to yield the right-of-way to the oncoming car. 2. to give up something to someone. The army yielded the territory to the invading army. We yielded the territory to the government.
See also: yield

yield to someone

 
1. to let someone go ahead; to give someone the right-of-way. Please yield to the next speaker. She yielded to the next speaker.
2. to give in to someone. She found it hard to yield to her husband in an argument. I will yield to no one.
See also: yield

yield to

v.
1. To give oneself up to someone, as in defeat: The platoon chose to fight to the end and would not yield to the enemy.
2. To give way to some pressure or force: The door yielded to a gentle push.
3. To give way to some argument, persuasion, influence, or entreaty: I'm dieting, but I sometimes yield to temptation and eat a cookie.
4. To give up one's place, as to one that is superior: The moderator opened the conference and then yielded to the chairperson.
See also: yield

yield up

v.
To sacrifice or concede something: The inhabitants of the city yielded it up to the invaders without a fight. I sometimes dream of yielding up the comfort of modern society to live in a cabin in the woods. The boxer held the heavyweight title for three years and then yielded it up to a young contender.
See also: up, yield
References in periodicals archive ?
The juicy yields make them less sensitive to interest rates, since investors determine prices by judging a company's ability to pay back its debt, not the direction of interest rates.
Bad weather pushed 2003 yields down to near 1993 levels, and prices had to rise to ration the limited supplies.
The fluorescence yields will be compared relative to a standard reference solution of a fluorophore such as fluorescein.
In every farming environment where yields are increased substantially, there comes a time when the increase slows and either levels off or shows signs of doing so.
A debt instrument with an indefinite maturity and a fixed yield (as defined in Regs.
In fact, some seasoned Treasuries occasionally provide higher yields than comparable-maturity agency issues.
With CDs and money-market accounts paying out the skimpiest yields in decades, millions of Americans are siphoning their dollars out of banks and into mutual funds.
SpencerLab now certifies testing compliance with these standards, as well as with the monochrome toner cartridge yield standard, ISO/IEC 19752.
The study shows that switchgrass pulp at about 60% yield has a good potential for use as one of the components in newsprint or liner manufacture.
That is, yields for these types of bonds are extremely high compared with Treasury bonds.
Let's say you have an investment with a 90-day maturity, but the yield curve has changed so that yields have become sharply higher at six months than was the case when you bought the investment.
Disregarding some data may actually help farmers and commodities brokers predict crop yields more accurately.
Fabbrix has developed a proprietary solution for overcoming the shortfalls of restricted design rules necessary to achieve high yields without sacrificing area utilization at advanced nodes.
The maturities of government bonds are plotted on the x axis, the yields, or interest each bond pays, on the y axis.