yield

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Related to yielding: unsystematic, flatterable

yield to pressure

To give into outside forces urging someone to do something. Sally wasn't even going to apply for that boring job, but she yielded to pressure from her mother and submitted her resume nonetheless.
See also: pressure, yield

yield the ghost

To die. Based on the idea that one's spirit leaves the body when one dies. More commonly expressed in the phrase "give up the ghost." Susie called me in tears when grandma yielded the ghost after her long illness. Well, if the mechanic can't work his magic this time, it looks like Marshall's car will finally yield the ghost.
See also: ghost, yield

yield someone or something (over) (to someone or something)

to give up someone or something to someone or something. (The over is typically used where the phrase is synonymous with hand over.) You must yield Tom over to his mother. Will you yield the right-of-way to the other driver, or not? Please yield the right-of-way to me.

yield someone or something up (to someone)

to give someone or something up to someone. He had to yield his daughter up to Claire. The judge required that Tom yield up his daughter to his ex-wife. Finally, he yielded up the money.
See also: up, yield

yield something to someone

 
1. . to give the right-of-way to someone. You must yield the right-of-way to pedestrians. You failed to yield the right-of-way to the oncoming car. 2. to give up something to someone. The army yielded the territory to the invading army. We yielded the territory to the government.
See also: yield

yield to someone

 
1. to let someone go ahead; to give someone the right-of-way. Please yield to the next speaker. She yielded to the next speaker.
2. to give in to someone. She found it hard to yield to her husband in an argument. I will yield to no one.
See also: yield

yield to

v.
1. To give oneself up to someone, as in defeat: The platoon chose to fight to the end and would not yield to the enemy.
2. To give way to some pressure or force: The door yielded to a gentle push.
3. To give way to some argument, persuasion, influence, or entreaty: I'm dieting, but I sometimes yield to temptation and eat a cookie.
4. To give up one's place, as to one that is superior: The moderator opened the conference and then yielded to the chairperson.
See also: yield

yield up

v.
To sacrifice or concede something: The inhabitants of the city yielded it up to the invaders without a fight. I sometimes dream of yielding up the comfort of modern society to live in a cabin in the woods. The boxer held the heavyweight title for three years and then yielded it up to a young contender.
See also: up, yield
References in periodicals archive ?
Particularly recommended are Triple-A, 10-year munis yielding between 5.
Bonds that mature in about 2 1/2 years are yielding around 4%.
At the time of first inclusion in the portfolio, Brascan was among the highest dividend yielding stocks on the TSX with a 2.
We are very pleased to work with Virage Logic to add this important part of the pDfx infrastructure, which is designed to help Virage Logic's customers increase their profitability by creating better yielding designs.
COM(TM) will prove to be a great product suite for our customers to add to our great yielding tool.
57% on a taxable investment to match the tax-exempt income from of a tax-free mutual fund yielding 6%.
Through its DBYI offering, PDF unveils an exceptional solution to address the challenges faced by a growing number of fabless IC makers in achieving higher yielding volume production swiftly.
We are seeing bonds that had been yielding 8-percent now yielding 9.
In the fourth quarter, higher yielding securities continued to do well relative to other areas of the fixed income market.