yield


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Related to yield: Yield to maturity, Yield curve, Yield sign

yield to pressure

To give into outside forces urging someone to do something. Sally wasn't even going to apply for that boring job, but she yielded to pressure from her mother and submitted her resume nonetheless.
See also: pressure, yield

yield the ghost

To die. Based on the idea that one's spirit leaves the body when one dies. More commonly expressed in the phrase "give up the ghost." Susie called me in tears when grandma yielded the ghost after her long illness. Well, if the mechanic can't work his magic this time, it looks like Marshall's car will finally yield the ghost.
See also: ghost, yield

yield someone or something (over) (to someone or something)

to give up someone or something to someone or something. (The over is typically used where the phrase is synonymous with hand over.) You must yield Tom over to his mother. Will you yield the right-of-way to the other driver, or not? Please yield the right-of-way to me.

yield someone or something up (to someone)

to give someone or something up to someone. He had to yield his daughter up to Claire. The judge required that Tom yield up his daughter to his ex-wife. Finally, he yielded up the money.
See also: up, yield

yield something to someone

 
1. . to give the right-of-way to someone. You must yield the right-of-way to pedestrians. You failed to yield the right-of-way to the oncoming car. 2. to give up something to someone. The army yielded the territory to the invading army. We yielded the territory to the government.
See also: yield

yield to someone

 
1. to let someone go ahead; to give someone the right-of-way. Please yield to the next speaker. She yielded to the next speaker.
2. to give in to someone. She found it hard to yield to her husband in an argument. I will yield to no one.
See also: yield

yield to

v.
1. To give oneself up to someone, as in defeat: The platoon chose to fight to the end and would not yield to the enemy.
2. To give way to some pressure or force: The door yielded to a gentle push.
3. To give way to some argument, persuasion, influence, or entreaty: I'm dieting, but I sometimes yield to temptation and eat a cookie.
4. To give up one's place, as to one that is superior: The moderator opened the conference and then yielded to the chairperson.
See also: yield

yield up

v.
To sacrifice or concede something: The inhabitants of the city yielded it up to the invaders without a fight. I sometimes dream of yielding up the comfort of modern society to live in a cabin in the woods. The boxer held the heavyweight title for three years and then yielded it up to a young contender.
See also: up, yield
References in periodicals archive ?
Given this interpretation, future short-term rates may be expected to decline, which tends to reduce current long-term rates and flatten the yield curve.
1272-1(b) constant yield method to allocate the debt issuance costs to each year.
Net returns to corn remain very high; corn yields are rising at a much faster rate than those for other crops; new biotech varieties and improved seed treatments make growing continuous corn more practical; and concerns about Asian rust may discourage some farmers from planting soybeans.
The second part has a smaller brightness increase, an accelerated yield loss, and a greater effect on strengthening.
In many cases the emission spectrum is independent of the excitation wavelength and can be written as a product of a quantum yield and a normalized relative emission function [see Appendix Eq.
Remember, these are total returns, or coupon yield plus any principal appreciation or depreciation during the quarter -- not yield.
7 percent--largely, Brown says, because of belated yield surges in China and Brazil.
Dividend -- The dividend levels for high yield mutual funds have the potential to remain quite stable if the economy maintains its current growth rate.
If he had acted earlier he could have locked in a yield over 8 percent.
High yield: The yield to maturity must equal or exceed the AFR (for the month of issue) plus five percentage points.
For over a decade leading vendors have relied on SpencerLab to provide certified yield testing and associated Cost-per-Print analyses.
Argentinean farm managers often do not have firsthand experience of their fields from the tractor seat, so yield maps can provide new information for them and can serve as a check on the quality of custom operator work.
This regulation, known as the "noncontingent bond method" allows an issuer to accrue an original issue discount (OID) deduction at a yield "comparable" to that of a fixed-rate instrument with similar terms and conditions, but without contingencies.