wax angry

(redirected from wroth)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.

wax angry

 and wax wroth
Fig. to speak in anger and with indignity. Seeing the damage done by the careless children caused the preacher to wax wroth at their parents.
See also: angry, wax
References in periodicals archive ?
Both Bragado-Young and Wroth have specialized in character parts--Bottom in The Dream and Anna in La Sylphide, respectively.
As it is documented in the text of the masque, the chief masquer was Queen Anne, and among the dancers, there were the Countess of Bedford, the Countess of Suffolk, Lady Anne Herbert, Lady Susan Herbert, and Mary Wroth (244-55).
Dyma pryd y cafodd yr eglwys annibynnol (independent) gyntaf ei chodi yn Llanfaches, Gwent gan William Wroth.
A "third" edition with a new introduction by Lawrence Wroth was published in 1962, twenty-one years after Updike's death.
Intended as a guide to its subject for `both beginning and more advanced students', the book proceeds simply from one poet to the next, with the most canonical given chapters to themselves (Donne, Jonson, Herbert, Milton of the 1645 Poems, Vaughan, and Marvell) and the less canonical grouped in three other chapters (Drayton, Wither, and company in `Patriotic and Popular Poets'; Carew, Herrick, and company in `Caroline Amusements'; eight women poets in `From Wroth to Philips').
100 Years Ago Yesterday morning, before sunrise, the ancient custom of the agent of the Duke of Buccleuch and Queensbury, K T, P C, taking what is called wroth silver, was observed at Knightlow Hill, a few miles south of Coventry.
Also a challenge for underwriters are applications for policies seeking far too much insurance compared to the individual's actual net wroth.
Yet, to those whose assumptions remain obstinately unrevised, it is still not clear that the dramas of Elizabeth Cary or Mary Wroth, the poems of Aemilia Lanyer or Mary Sidney, must automatically constitute significant achievements because of the sex of their authors (a point equally applicable, of course, to works by men).
It includes no description of working conditions within the sweatshops, leaving the reader with a vague sense that he is expected to wax wroth over the Kellwood's greed and duplicity without being told precisely why.
Wroth, The Colonial Printer (Portland, Maine: Southworth-Anthoensen Press, 1938), pp.
In her final chapter, an excellent introduction to Lady Mary Sidney Wroth, Lewalski reads the Urania as an appropriation of both lyric and romance genres for the purpose of critiquing court culture and erotic life; she regards Wroth as the most creative and prolific writer among these women.
But wringing and twisting can also be traced back to the Icelandic ri[delta]a and the Danish vride, which are predecessors of our modern day writhe (to twist to and fro), wreathe (a twisted band, a bandage), and, most interestingly, wrath, which comes from the Middle English wroth, and the Anglo-Saxon wrod, "to writhe, so that the original sense was twisted or perverted in one's temper.
Wroth, Texas, have initiated several such projects.
Perhaps it would be wroth trying the experiments on champagne -- just to check.
It is wroth mentioning that the Business Umbrella Program, which was launched in 1991, aim at developing the leadership and administrative skills of the officials at the Omani factories and keeping them updated with the latest developments in the field.