wrong


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
See:
References in periodicals archive ?
Enhanced numbers of Traffic Wardens have been deployed at busy roads to clear wrong parking while lifters will also be available to lift vehicles and motorcycles parked in a wrong way, he added.
MDOT has instituted a protocol to alert motorists on the electronic signs that there's someone going the wrong way, so other drivers can be alerted," MSP Lt.
For example, the harmless trespass will only constitute a wrong within the context of a convention of property rights.
Eight "foreign objects" were also accidentally left inside patients after procedures, while one person received the wrong implant or prosthesis.
Barrie's classic tale of Peter Pan, but as the title suggests, everything that can go wrong does, as the accident prone thesps embark on a thrilling adventure to Neverland, with hilariously disastrous results.
Newcastle City Council wrote to electors last month to tell them about changes in how they register to vote but, due to a mistake, the wrong information was posted out.
The purpose of this project was to determine if anesthesia nursing students are more likely to change their answers from wrong to right, right to wrong, or wrong to wrong.
The figures also showed that 37 patients had the wrong part of their body operated on or treated.
Mourinho is clearly better at management than maths as he insisted a journalist was wrong when he claimed the Portuguese had enjoyed just three wins over Guardiola.
was wrong Wrong about anyway it was anyway and you've had it wrong
The BBC said: "They are in the wrong place, at the wrong time, with the wrong skills.
We mean, wrong in the same way it's wrong to tear out of the house in bare feet and waving dollar bills when the ice cream truck toots its horn.
The left turner has to drive past the wrong ramp to reach the correct one, whereas the right turner encounters the correct ramp immediately.
Wrong site surgery is defined as "the performance of an operation or surgical procedure on the wrong part of the body.
ONCE again this week brought us another case of a jockey taking a wrong course at a track in Britain when Sam Waley-Cohen was hit with a 12-day ban in controversial circumstances.