wrest

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Related to wrests: wrestled

wrest someone or something (away) from someone or something

to struggle to get someone or something from the grip of someone or something. The kidnappers wrested the baby from his mother and ran away with him. The policeman wrested the gun away from Lefty.
See also: wrest

wrest something off (of) something

 and wrest something off
to struggle to get something off something. (Of is usually retained before pronouns.) Somehow he wrested the hubcap off the wheel. He wrested off the hubcap.
See also: off, wrest

wrest from

v.
1. To obtain something from someone or something by pulling with violent twisting movements: I wrested the hammer from his fist.
2. To usurp or obtain possession of something forcefully from someone or something: The duke wrested power from the monarchy.
3. To extract something from someone or something by or as if by force, twisting, or persistent effort: In class I struggled to wrest the meaning from an obscure poem.
See also: wrest

wrest off

v.
To obtain or remove something from someone or something by pulling with violent twisting movements: The thief wrested off the hood ornament from the car. I wrested the car keys off him.
See also: off, wrest

wrest out

v.
1. To obtain something from someone or something by pulling with violent twisting movements: The farmer dug into the soil and wrested out a fresh turnip. The bullies wrested the book out of the little boy's hands and ran off with it.
2. To extract something from someone or something by or as if by force, twisting, or persistent effort: I was finally able to wrest out some meaning from the jumbled essay. The police wrested a confession out of the suspect.
3. To escape from something by pulling with violent twisting movements: The cat wrested out of my arms and jumped to the floor.
See also: out, wrest
References in classic literature ?
But how to wrest the body of his victim from the feeding lion was the first question to be solved.
She has been in this room," he cried, and he sprang to wrest from it a token, for he knew he would recognize the smallest thing that had belonged to her or that she had touched.
Lucille is mine - mine she will remain, even though you should descend to something more despicable, more cowardly than ordinary treason, to wrest her from me.
When we leave this place, on whatever terms we leave it, my determination to wrest from Count Fosco the confession which I failed to obtain from his accomplice, goes back with me to London, as certainly as I go back myself.
He wrests these symbols from their familiar contexts or interrupts their assumptions by blurring the text as in the recent text paintings extracted from James Baldwin's 1953 essay "Stranger in the Village".
That he has streamlined the story is laudable, but he runs the ship aground by placing Caesar and the conspirators on the same dramatic level; with the possible exception of Mendelson's Antony, nobody dominates the action or wrests our attention for anything more than brief moments.
Much of this he wrests from a close examination of "two peace treaties imposed on Pisa in 1288 and 1299" (154).