wound

(redirected from woundingly)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia.
Related to woundingly: malicious wounding

pour salt in(to) the/(someone's) wound(s)

To make something that is already difficult, unpleasant, or painful even worse; to accentuate, aggravate, or intensify a negative situation, emotion, or experience (for someone). After losing the championship match, it really poured salt in John's wound for his girlfriend break up with him the next day. My pride was already hurting when I didn't get the job, but hearing that they gave it to Dave really poured salt into the wound. I can't believe you would ask me to pay you back on the day that I got laid off. Thanks for pouring salt in my wounds, man.
See also: pour, salt

salt in the/(one's) wound(s)

An aggravation that makes something unpleasant, difficult, or painful even worse. I can't believe Sally broke up with John the day after his team lost the championship match. Talk about salt in the wounds! My pride was already hurting when I didn't get the job, but it was like salt in my wound to hear that they gave it to Dave instead.
See also: salt

have (someone) wound around (one's) (little) finger

To have complete control, dominance, or mastery over somebody; to be able to make someone do whatever one wishes. The spoiled little brat has his parents completely wound around his little finger. Everyone accused her of getting the promotion by having the boss wound around her finger.
See also: around, finger, have, wound

have (someone) wound round (one's) (little) finger

To have complete control, dominance, or mastery over somebody; to be able to make someone do whatever one wishes. The spoiled little brat has his parents completely wound round his little finger. Everyone accused her of getting the promotion by having the boss wound round her finger.
See also: finger, have, round, wound

wind up in

To arrive someplace or in some situation, with the sense that getting there was not planned. My brother is a very spontaneous traveler and just spends his time in whatever country he winds up in! We had some time to kill before the concert, so we walked around and wound up in a coffee shop.
See also: up, wind

all wound up

Very tense and/or nervous. Jittery. A: "Why is Don pacing?" B: "I think he's all wound up because he's next to get a performance review."
See also: all, up, wound

time heals all wounds

Emotional pain lessens over time. I know it's hard to consider now, as you're grieving, but time heals all wounds. I'm sure you will reconcile with Kathleen eventually. After all, time heals all wounds.
See also: all, heal, time, wound

rub salt in(to) the/(one's) wound(s)

To make something that is already difficult, unpleasant, or painful even worse; to accentuate, aggravate, or intensify a negative situation, emotion, or experience (for someone). After losing the championship match, it really rubbed salt in John's wound for his girlfriend to break up with him the next day. My pride was already hurting when I didn't get the job, but hearing that they gave it to Dave really rubbed salt into the wound. I can't believe you would ask me to pay you back on the day that I got laid off. Thanks for rubbing salt in my wounds, man.
See also: rub, salt

open old wounds

To bring up or remind someone of a painful, tragic, or unfortunate past event or situation. Seeing Jessica with her new girlfriend opened a lot of old wounds this afternoon. The fight got pretty nasty, and we both started opening old wounds from years ago.
See also: old, open, wound

reopen old wounds

To bring up or remind someone of a painful, tragic, or unfortunate past event or situation. Seeing Jessica with her new girlfriend reopened a lot of old wounds this afternoon. The fight got pretty nasty, and we both started reopening old wounds from years ago.
See also: old, reopen, wound

twist the knife

To add to, exacerbate, or amplify a betrayal or wrong by further malicious actions. He said it was over, and then he twisted the knife and said he had never loved me.
See also: knife, twist

lick one's wounds

Fig. to recover from a defeat or a rebuke. (Also literal for an animal.) After the terrible meeting and all the criticism, I went back to my office to lick my wounds.
See also: lick, wound

rub salt in a wound

Fig. to deliberately make someone's unhappiness, shame, or misfortune worse. Don't rub salt in the wound by telling me how enjoyable the party was. Bill is feeling miserable about losing his job and Bob is rubbing salt into the wound by saying how good his replacement is.
See also: rub, salt, wound

rub something in

Fig. to keep reminding one of one's failures; to nag someone about something. I like to rub it in. You deserve it! Why do you have to rub in everything I do wrong?
See also: rub

lick one's wounds

Recuperate from injuries or hurt feelings. For example, They were badly beaten in the debate and went home sadly to lick their wounds. This expression alludes to an animal's behavior when wounded. It was originally put as lick oneself clean or whole, dating from the mid-1500s.
See also: lick, wound

rub in

Also, rub it in. Harp on something, especially an unpleasant matter, as in She always rubs in the fact that she graduated with honors and I didn't, or I know I forgot your birthday, but don't keep rubbing it in. This idiom alludes to the expression rub salt into a wound, an action that makes the wound more painful; it dates from medieval times and remains current. [Mid-1800s] Also see rub someone's nose in it.
See also: rub

twist the knife

or

twist the knife in the wound

If someone twists the knife or twists the knife in the wound, they deliberately do or say something which make a situation even worse for someone who is upset or experiencing problems. Her daughter managed to twist the knife still further by claiming Nancy never loved her. To twist the knife in the wound, he appears to have cast doubt on whether Gray's invention was really his own idea. Note: You can also talk about a twist of the knife. Any cut-backs on the ceremony would be a further twist of the knife for bereaved families.
See also: knife, twist

rub salt into the wound

or

rub salt in the wound

COMMON If someone or something rubs salt into the wound or in the wound, they make a situation that is already bad for a person seem even worse. I wasn't allowed to eat anything for 24 hours before the operation so I was really hungry and just to rub salt into the wound, had to sit there while Zoe ate the most delicious-looking pizza. The police rubbed salt in the wounds by waving money in the strikers' faces, a reminder of all the overtime they were earning.
See also: rub, salt, wound

lick your wounds

COMMON If someone licks their wounds, they feel embarrassed and disappointed, especially after being defeated very easily. England's cricketers are licking their wounds after being soundly defeated in the second Test against Australia at Melbourne. Note: Some animals, such as dogs and cats, lick their wounds when they are injured.
See also: lick, wound

open old wounds

or

reopen old wounds

If something or someone opens old wounds or reopens old wounds, they remind you of an unpleasant experience in the past that you would prefer to forget. I didn't raise the subject again — I was in no hurry to open old wounds. It is said that the row is reopening old wounds among Conservative MPs.
See also: old, open, wound

twist (or turn) the knife

deliberately make someone's grief or problems worse.
1991 Mavis Nicholson Martha Jane & Me While she and I were playing the cat-and-mouse game of these stories, I would sometimes, just to twist the knife a little further, ask about the little girl's father.
See also: knife, twist

lick your wounds

retire to recover your strength or confidence after a defeat or humiliating experience.
See also: lick, wound

rub salt into the (or someone's) wound

make a painful experience even more painful for someone.
See also: rub, salt, wound

lick your ˈwounds

spend time trying to get your strength and confidence back after a defeat or disappointment: ‘He heard this morning that he hasn’t got the job.’ ‘Where is he?’ ‘Licking his wounds somewhere, probably.’
See also: lick, wound

reopen old ˈwounds

remind somebody of something unpleasant that happened or existed in the past: Look, let’s try not to reopen any old wounds this time, OK?
See also: old, reopen, wound

rub ˈsalt into the wound/into somebody’s wounds

make somebody who is already feeling upset, angry, etc. about something feel even worse: She was already upset about not getting the job, but when they gave it to one of her own trainees it really rubbed salt into the wound.
See also: rub, salt, wound

rub in

v.
1. To work something into a surface by rubbing: I put lotion on my hands and rubbed it in. Don't try to clean the shirt now—you will only rub in the stain.
2. To talk deliberately and excessively about something unpleasant in order to make another person feel bad: She always rubs in the fact that she has more money than me. I know I made a mistake—there's no need to rub it in.
See also: rub

walking wounded

1. n. soldiers who are injured but still able to walk. (Standard English.) Many of the walking wounded helped with the more seriously injured cases.
2. n. a person who is injured—mentally or physically—and still able to go about daily life. The outpatient clinic was filled with the walking wounded.
3. n. stupid people in general. Most of network programming seems to be aimed at the walking wounded of our society.
See also: walking, wound

lick (one's) wounds

To recuperate after a defeat.
See also: lick, wound