workaholic

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workaholic

n. someone who is obsessed with work. Jerry is a workaholic. He can’t enjoy a vacation.
References in periodicals archive ?
The relationship of workaholism with work-life conflict, life satisfaction, and purpose in life.
downsizing, tele-work, workaholism, person-job fit, motivation, discrimination, distributive justice, ergonomics, age issues) appear to receive limited attention from researchers.
Workaholism sets in when our work becomes the most important aspects of our identity and activities, notably neglecting all other facets of our personal life.
A timely survey helps contextualise workaholism, specifically in the UAE.
Looking at workaholism as a type of addiction means that a distinction can be made between people who really enjoy their job and are engaged in it, with those who have an uncontrollable motivation to work that negatively impacts on their life.
In fact, organizations typically embrace the characteristics of stereotypical workaholics; however, life outside of work can be negatively affected by workaholism (Garson, 2005; Gini, 1998).
You can ally the grace of David Silva with the workaholism of Carlos Tevez and the goal threat of Edin Dzeko.
Recognizing that difference, as well as being able to recognize the signs of workaholism in yourself, and the staff you manage, could be of enormous benefit.
time & stress management, workaholism, fear of success, assertiveness, self-image as worker, self recognition of accomplishments, handling perfectionism) And finally, your community life?
Results indicated that higher levels of self-reported workaholism related significantly to lower levels of self-acceptance and well-being, as well as to more physical health complaints.
HOME & AWAY: Angelo's workaholism becomes a cause for concern, and April and Bianca are kicked out of Gina's house.
Workaholism is the narcotic version of this, executed within the individual himself.
Jack could also be driven to workaholism by situation and circumstances.
After confessing how absent she has been as a wife and a mother, she defends her workaholism but then, paradoxically, worries: 'I wonder if I have lost myself somewhere along the way.
People who feel their lives are full of meaning report less workaholism and better work adjustment (Bonebright, Clay, & Ankenmann, 2000), and college students high in meaning in life express greater certainty regarding their future occupation (Tryon & Radzin, 1972).