work out


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work out

 
1. [for something] to turn out all right in the end. (See also turn out (all right); work out (as something).) Don't worry. Everything will work out. This will work out. Don't worry.
2. . [for someone] to do a program of exercise. I work out at least twice a week. I need to work out more often.
See also: out, work

work out (somehow)

to result in a good conclusion; to finish positively. Don't worry. I am sure that everything will work out all right. Things always work out in the end.
See also: out, work

work out

 (at something)
1. . [for someone] to perform satisfactorily doing something in particular. I hope I work out at my new job. I'm sure you'll work out.
2. . to perform satisfactorily working in a particular location. I hope I work out at the factory. I really need that job. Things will work out at home in time.
See also: out, work

work out (somehow)

to result in a good conclusion; to finish positively. Don't worry. I am sure that everything will work out all right. Things always work out in the end.
See also: out, work

work something out (with someone)

to come to an agreement with someone; to figure out with someone a way to do something. I think we can work this out with you so that all of us are satisfied. I will work out something with Karen. I'm sure we can work it out.
See also: out, work

work out

1. to develop in a satisfactory way It was too bad that my plan didn't work out. Is your new job working out well?
2. to get physical exercise I work out at the gym twice a week.
See also: out, work

work out something

also work something out
to find a solution to something The committee met today and worked out a statement that everyone liked. You can use a calculator to work out the problem, or you can work it out on paper.
See also: out, work

work out

1. Accomplish by work or effort, as in I think we can work out a solution to this problem. [1500s] For work out all right, see turn out all right.
2. Find a solution for, solve, as in They hoped to work out their personal differences, or Can you help me work out this equation? [Mid-1800s]
3. Formulate or develop, as in We were told to work out a new plan, or He's very good at working out complicated plots. [Early 1800s]
4. Discharge a debt by working instead of paying money, as in She promised she'd work out the rest of the rent by baby-sitting for them. [Second half of 1600s]
5. Prove effective or successful, as in I wonder if their marriage will work out.
6. Have a specific result, add up, as in It worked out that she was able to go to the party after all, or The total works out to more than a million. [Late 1800s]
7. Engage in strenuous exercise for physical conditioning, as in He works out with weights every other day. [1920s]
8. Exhaust a resource, such as a mine, as in This mine has been completely worked out. [Mid-1500s]
See also: out, work

work out

v.
1. To remove or eliminate something from something by repeated, continuous, or applied effort: We tried for hours to work the stain out of the shirt. No matter how hard we tried, we couldn't work the knot out of the rope. I worked out the tangles with a comb.
2. To solve or resolve something by work or effort: The mathematician worked out the answer over several days. We have our disagreements, but we always work them out.
3. To formulate or develop something: The lawyers worked out a strategy for the trial. We have no plans yet; we still need to work them out.
4. To discharge or arrange to discharge some obligation or debt: I worked out my high phone bill with the creditors.
5. To prove successful, effective, or satisfactory: The new strategy may not work out.
6. To have some specified result: The ratio works out to an odd number. It worked out that everyone left on the same train.
7. To engage in strenuous exercise for physical conditioning: You look very trim and fit; have you been working out? I work out at the gym twice a week.
8. To subject some part of the body to exertion for physical conditioning: Sit-ups work out the abdominal muscles.
9. To exhaust or deplete something. Used chiefly in the passive: After a hundred years in operation, the mine was worked out.
10. work out of To have some place as a central office or work location: I work out of my house.
See also: out, work