work in


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Related to work in: work in process

work in

1. To be employed in some field or industry. I think he said that his husband works in marketing. It had always been my dream to work in film as a kid.
2. To employ a particular style or material when creating some artistic piece. The painter only works in acrylics. I worked in Futurism, Cubism, and Expressionism before finding a style that felt truly unique to me.
3. To insert, introduce, or implement something into something else, especially when doing so does not come naturally or easily. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "work" and "in." The director even worked a clever reference to Casablanca in toward the end of the film. You can try working in a clause like that when you draw up the contract, but I bet their lawyers will have an issue with it.
4. To attempt to allow someone or something to fit into a full or busy schedule. Now, we currently have every shift covered for the next week, but I can try to work you in on a couple of those days until we draw up the next work roster. My day is going to be extremely busy tomorrow, but I need to work in a trip to the dentist somewhere in there.
5. To be suitable, acceptable, or appropriate in some particular setting or context. The juvenile humor just really doesn't work in what is otherwise supposed to be a heartfelt comedic drama. I feel like all the contrasting colors don't really work in a painting that's meant to be so realistic.
6. To cause some substance to absorbed or mixed into something else by rubbing, kneading, or massaging vigorously. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "work" and "in." He rubbed the ointment on my aching shoulder and worked it in. You'll have to work in the moisturizer for a good while before the leather starts to soften up completely.
See also: work

work in

1. Insert or introduce, as in As part of their presentation they worked in a request for funding the exhibit. Similarly, work into means "insert or introduce into something else," as in She worked more flour into the mixture. [Late 1600s]
2. Make time for in a schedule, as in The dentist said he would try to work her in this morning. Here, too, work into is sometimes used, as in She had to work two emergency cases into her morning schedule. [Mid-1700s]
See also: work

work in

v.
1. To cause something to be inserted by repeated or continuous effort: Hold the cloth in one hand and work in the thread using a needle. The dough won't absorb the extra flour unless you work it in by kneading.
2. To insert or make space for something: When I wrote the report, I worked in a request for money. It's an unusual proposal, but I think I can work it in.
3. To make time available for something or someone in an otherwise busy or filled schedule: I know you don't have an appointment, but the doctor will try to work you in.
4. To share equipment at a gymnasium or fitness center with a person who is already using it: He had been using the weight machine for 30 minutes, so I asked if I could work in.
See also: work
References in periodicals archive ?
And it will say on it, I'm authorized to work in the United States of America - that's it.
The company's portfolio of software and services work in concert.
Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS) Permanent Resident "Green Cards" conferring the right to live and work in the United States, and about 30% are to be used as U.
Governmental and commercial examples include the right to reside and work in another country; cross a border for commercial purposes; carry on a business or profession; receive medical care, welfare benefits, or importing privileges; utilize a motor vehicle; construct buildings; utilize expensive medical equipment on a pay-per-use basis; obtain automobile maintenance services; or obtain certain purchasing or tax benefits.
This team represents a strong combination of business and industry experience that complements the talents and contributions of the GTP employees already at work in the UK and Europe.
Other products include DOORSnet(TM), that brings the functionality of DOORS to distributed work teams via the Internet, and an entry-level tool, DOORSrequireIT(TM), that brings the benefits of requirements management to non-engineering users and those users who prefer to work in MS(R) Word(TM).