work for


Also found in: Legal.

work for someone

 
1. to be employed by someone. She works for Scott Wallace. Who do you work for?
2. . to work as a substitute for someone. I will work for you while you are having your baby. Right now, I am working for Julie, who is out sick.
See also: work

work for something

 
1. to work for a group, company, etc. Everyone at the picnic works for the same employer. We work for the telephone company.
2. . to work for a certain amount of money. She says she works for a very good wage. I won't work for that kind of pay.
3. to work for an intangible benefit, such as satisfaction, glory, honor, etc. The pay isn't very good. I just work for the fun of it. Sam says he works for the joy of working.
See also: work

work for

v.
1. To be employed by or work on behalf of someone or some organization: I've worked for the government for the past ten years. I started my own company, so now I work for myself.
2. To provide labor in exchange for something: The traveler didn't want any money; he said he would work for food.
3. To work on behalf of some cause: Our organization works for the humane treatment of animals.
4. To function or operate correctly when used by someone: The VCR always seems to work for me, but whenever someone else tries it, it freezes up. They should stick with the same strategy, because it worked for them last year.
5. To function or operate correctly when used for some purpose: The bug spray only works for mosquitoes.
6. To meet the requirements of someone; fit someone: Unless it has three bedrooms, I don't think the house will work for us. Can we find a restaurant that works for all of us?
7. To be appropriate for someone; befit someone: I'm not sure that color works for you.
See also: work
References in periodicals archive ?
When actually fighting structural fires, fire fighters work for a period of time, exit the burning building, recover, and then reenter the building to work again.
For example, a provider of professional services from a single California office who does little or no work for out-of-state clients and who does little or no out-of-state marketing may not be FSLA governed, while a provider with offices in multiple states probably is FLSA governed.
One can only hope that the next stage after satire and self-help is the will to work for social change.
The growth of part-time work for women certainly offered material gains for women, but in other spheres, it is hard to see a clear empirical case for any convergence between male and female workers.
More to the point, who would want to work for a company that adopts a Big Brother mentality?
For example, SSDI beneficiaries can work for up to 9 months in a 5-year period (with a 3-month grace period) without losing benefits under the Trial Work Period (TWP).
The primary purpose was to direct readers to appropriate works, but not to actually do any of the work for the reader.
All of these employees sought the work either because they had small children at home or because of other personal or professional reasons," she says, noting that three of the last four people to work for her in these positions were men.
Physicians often believe that they must control their practices by controlling the work of the people who work for them.
So, for example, if you go back to work for one month and discover that you are not yet ready, only one month of your trial work period is used.
We stress our financing, it enables owners to do work for $100,000 which would wind up costing them $300,000," said Post.
Asking welfare recipients to work for their checks is undoubtedly a good, even overdue, idea, but the push for work shouldn't be fired by the sense that welfare moms want to languish in front of the soaps all day instead of earning a living.
The terms work and leisure are used to distinguish between work for pay or profit or looking for such work) and all other activities, only some of which would be what is usually considered leisure.
The first part of the second principle is known as the fair equality of opportunity principle; it guarantees equal access to education and work for citizens with equal ability and talent, irrespective of their socio-economic class background.
Peter Ballantine, who worked with Judd for twenty-five years, repairs Judd's sculpture, a business independent of his work for the Judd Foundation.