work as

work as something

to work in the capacity of something. I worked as a waiter for a year when I was in college. I will work as a stockbroker for a while, and then move on to something else.
See also: work

work as

v.
1. To serve the purpose of something: The pegs on the wall work as coat hangers.
2. To do the work associated with someone or something: At night, I work as a waiter.
See also: work
References in periodicals archive ?
School counselors have a changing role in supporting the needs of students and workers for basic academic skills, productive work habits, work values, and means of relating paid and unpaid work as parts of total lifestyle.
The majority of full-time mothers and full-time workers alike chose part-time work as their first preference.
For many of us who work as rehabilitation consultants, there appears to be a discrepant gap between the shifting demands of the current labor market and the skills and abilities of many of the clients we work with.
There she tried to find work as a copyist but could not make enough to support herself.
During the first Reagan administration, waivers were given to states if they adapted policies that recognized work as an obligation.
Y N Is one of your biggest complaints that others don't work as hard as you?
Bishop defines, for the purposes of this discussion, reference work as "the service rendered by a librarian in aid of some sort of study" (p.
We work as a team and they wouldn't let teammates down.
Theoretical Considerations--Physicians in private practice do not work as a management team.
Instead, involuntary part-time employment has propelled the upward trend in total part-time work since the early 1970s, largely because employers view part-time work as a means to cut labor costs, and not because workers want shorter schedules.
In myths and lore the miners sexualized their labor and figured the mine as feminine, further deepening their definition of work as a source of masculine affirmation.
Thus, including the notice assists the user of the work as well as the copyright holder.
In a survey by Stewart, Chubon, and Ososkie (1988) of rehabilitation professionals and clients, which identified the most critical factors in settling a disability claim, 36% of professionals rated the exertional demands of work as an important factor, while 77.
Certainly some portion of truant youngsters simply rebelled against the rigor and confinement of school or employment, but it is likely too that some other part of this group were casual workers who tread a path between school and work as family need required.
Executives, particularly, now work as much as 20 percent longer than they did a decade ago (Kilborn, 1990).