wordplay

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wordplay

The use of words in a clever or amusing way, as seen in puns or double entendres. A: "Why was six afraid of seven? Because seven ate nine! Get it?" B: "Ah yes, wordplay with 'eight' and 'ate'—a classic."
References in periodicals archive ?
In this case the constant flow of word play articles (amongst many articles on math, politics, art and computers) was overwhelming and would have been more than enough to satisfy my appetite.
The word acts as a kind of pivot, which in Japanese is known as kakekotoba, a rhetorical scheme of word play in which a series of sounds is so employed as to mean two or more things at once by different parsings.
Call it a deeply recursive word play if you want, but since the item was about exhibitionism, taking advantage of this pun in the headline was a no-brainer.
He explains why hairdressers and fish and chip shops seem particularly attracted to word play in their choice of names like Curl Up And Dye and In Cod We Trust.
Yes, there were moments when I enjoyed Stoppard's verbal acrobatics, his conceits and word plays, his intricate and knife-sharp observations.
and the frantic dialogue, wonderful word play and crowds of innuendo leave no doubt that Ducktastic is from the same stable.
Full of magic, word play and allusions to other great reads, this is a literary treat.
The riddles and jokes are in the form of poems, stories, short phrases, word play, illustrations, and drawings.
No one offers genuine probabilities, specificities, or achievable goals; it is idle word play (p.
It's not just another inevitable piece of word play to say Milton Bradley is a player on whom the Dodgers are smart to roll the dice.
Seussian-like rhythm and rhyme, aim to create an auditory experience for children that helps them to learn beginning-reader sounds and encourages a love of language and word play.
So, toward the end of the play, when Handke hurled insults at "us," we were more delighted by the word play ("You bubbleheads, you atheists, you butchers, you deadbeats") than hurt or shocked.
As it says on its home page it is 'an eclectic collection of historic architecture, fine art, picturesque landscapes, word play .
In his article, "Partial Articulation: Word Play in A Farewell to Arms" (The Hemingway Review 20.
The question and word play together make that headline special -- and especially inviting.