woo away


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woo someone away (from someone or something)

to lure someone away from someone or something; to seduce someone away from someone or something. The manager of the new bank wooed all the tellers away from the old bank. They wooed away all the experienced people.
See also: away, woo
References in periodicals archive ?
Girobank yesterday announced a new pounds 200m partnership with Securicor in an alliance that will attempt to woo away lucrative business from Post Office owners Consignia.
Girobank yesterday announced a new pounds 200m partnership with Securicor that will attempt to woo away lucrative business from Post Office owner Consignia.
It has used big bucks to woo away the most popular entertainers from upstart channels that have won viewers and advertisers in recent months with a steady diet of racy soaps, and variety shows featuring a dominatrix quiz-show hostess and victims of physical deformities or unimaginable brutality.
The complaint further alleges that the departed partners then attempted to inflict further damage on H&C through seeking to woo away additional currently employed H&C attorneys by, among other things, hosting a Saturday recruitment reception at their new D,M&H offices the day after their departure from H&C.
We just want to woo away the locals, if only for the day.
Hammerhead's buybuy Baby win is just one of several larger accounts the agency has managed to woo away from larger New York and New Jersey firms.
So far, Anwar has only been able to woo away Fauzi Abdul Rahman a former senior government official from the ruling United Malays National Organization, who joined his party Wednesday.
By opening a film office in Los Angeles this month, Maryland has joined a growing list of states and countries setting up shop in Hollywood's back yard to woo away production business.
It was the brainchild of Conrad Beissel, a German Pietist who managed to woo away his followers from the Dunkards, a religious group that believed in triple baptism.
Assistant City Administrative Officer Thomas Sisson said the raises were recommended by Riordan to make Los Angeles city salaries competitive with pay offered by other cities that are trying to woo away the city's top officials.