wonk

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wonk

(wɔŋk)
1. n. an earnest student. (Collegiate.) Yes, you could call Martin a wonk. In fact, he’s the classic wonk.
2. n. a bureaucrat; a flunky. The State Department policy wonks were up all night putting together the report.
References in periodicals archive ?
Bush was selected as Wonk of the Year because of her work to create meaningful change in the world.
More that 250 researchers, students, and policy wonks gathered in Montreal in June for the second annual NanoForum Canada.
Some scenes seem intended to solicit knowing nods from diehard Juche wonks in the audience, who will get a kick out of seeing the origin story of the "Women's Association.
SURE THEY DO, YOU HARDCORE WONKS CAN FIND ALL THAT ON THE INTERNET.
Policy wonks, religious or secular, will recognize the names of these two authors--both live up to their reputations for rigorous policy analysis.
Along about the 1960s, however, CFR policy wonks began a campaign to deprecate the word and the concept, associating it with anarchy.
THE future for our fishing industry is job losses, according to the policy wonks of Downing Street.
The relatively small size of the Pacific island countries and territories means that they are often overlooked when the pundits and policy wonks develop their grand strategic visions.
For McQueen and other theoretically minded artists, as for military wonks, it boils down to a question of economy and strategy.
When we searched for "trans fat," for example, up came a technical scientific paper about food analysis that only laboratory wonks would find useful.
And then there are the moments, admittedly rare, when Reed sinks to plain old eye-for-an-eye: "Kevin Phillips, in The Cousins' War, refers to a back-country South Carolina population of Scots-Irish of the 1770s that was devoted to `loose hogs, lewd women, and drunken lay-ahouts, something that contemporary Scots-Irish think tank wonks and op-ed columnists might consider when writing yet another article or study that goes after welfare mothers.
As adoptees become mote vocal, adding their realities to the mountains of speculation, it may well be their experiences--more than the opinions of policy wonks, or even the parents themselves--that determine the future of the next generation of children in search of a loving home.
Mead does, of course, involve deference to a Customs classification ruling and the government attorneys arguing the case are not necessarily tax wonks.
wiretap law, but privacy wonks are not fully convinced that Carnivore meets those strict guidelines and have been critical of the FBI for using the technology.
Still, the case presents many issues for public policy wonks.