wonder at

wonder at someone or something

to be amazed at or in awe of someone or something. (Stilted.) We all wondered at Lee and the way he kept his spirits up. The people wondered at the bright light that lit up the sky.
See also: wonder

wonder at

v.
1. To be surprised or puzzled by something or someone: I wonder at your willingness to follow your boss's strange orders.
2. To be awed or astonished by something or someone; marvel at something: The children wondered at the colorful fish in the aquarium.
See also: wonder
References in classic literature ?
He could but wonder at the depth and the duration of his swoon.
Her behaviour, I confess, has been calculated to do away with such an idea; I have not detected the smallest impropriety in it--nothing of vanity, of pretension, of levity; and she is altogether so attractive that I should not wonder at his being delighted with her, had he known nothing of her previous to this personal acquaintance; but, against reason, against conviction, to be so well pleased with her, as I am sure he is, does really astonish me.
Thorley Rushworth gave way to wonder at the generosity of her view.
All this was very natural, and there's nothing at all to wonder at about it.
All this Sancho delivered with so much composure- wiping his nose from time to time- and with so little common-sense that his two hearers were again filled with wonder at the force of Don Quixote's madness that could run away with this poor man's reason.
Adults wonder at the extraordinary, "just as if it were the novelty and Not .