wolfpack

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wolfpack

A family group of wolves that live and hunt together. Be careful out there at night—a wolfpack has been seen roaming that part of the woods.
References in periodicals archive ?
Part II argues that current laws simultaneously underregulate and overregulate wolf packs to the detriment of both boards and investors.
Wolf packs emerged from the recent growth in shareholder activism.
15) The Hallwood decision loosened regulatory oversight of wolf packs and fueled their growth.
Economists believe that wolf packs tend to form when a single lead investor acquires a substantial stake in a target company.
The idea is to work out the most effective way of delivering rabies vaccination to around 30% to 40% of the animals - enough to prevent them being completely wiped out and for new generations to build up wolf pack numbers again.
1995) used a geographic information system (GIS) to assess landscape features that contributed to re-colonization of 14 Wisconsin wolf packs from 1980 to 1992.
2] have less than a 10% chance of being occupied by wolf packs.
2] supporting wolf packs in Minnesota but having large wilderness reservoirs nearby.
Average landscape variables for 14 wolf packs, random non-pack areas (n=14) and overall Wisconsin study area (modified from Mladenoff et al.
A wolf pack also has a territory--a place it moves around in, hunting prey and raising pups.
When, for instance, the Druid Peak wolf pack brought down an elk below Jackson Ridge, they quickly ate their fill, then wandered off, leaving the kill for a succession of opportunists.
Photo: Gray wolf territories in the 48 contiguous states have shrunk considerably since settlers began using land populated by wolf packs.
The wolf pack eventually corners preyfish in a shoreline bend.
In the wild, it's impossible to film wolves' social behavior up close, so the Dutchers put together their own wolf pack, acquiring captive pups in Montana, then relocating them to a 25-acre compound in Idaho's Sawtooth Mountains.
But, the Dutchers believe, the wolf pack still behaved much as one would in the wild.