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bear false witness

To lie about or misrepresent the truth about some event, person, or thing. In common usage, it usually refers to perjury (telling a lie while under oath in a court of law) or to the Ninth Commandment of the Old Testament, from which the phrase is taken: "Thou shalt not bear false witness against thy neighbor. Even if it is a small lie and seems harmless, if you bear false witness under oath, you may end up going to jail yourself.
See also: bear, false, witness

leading question

a question that suggests the kind of answer that the person who asks it wants to hear. The mayor was angered by the reporter's leading questions. "Don't you think that the police are failing to stop crime?" is an example of a leading question.
See also: leading, question

witness for someone or something

to serve as a witness for some person or some deed. They could find no one to witness to something witness for the accused person. The police found someone to witness for the hour of the crime.
See also: witness

witness to something

to serve as a witness to some act or deed. I was witness to the beating. We were not witness to any of the activities you have described.
See also: witness

bear witness to something

to show by your existence that something is true The survivors of this disaster bear witness to a terrible event we would like to forget.
See also: bear, witness

bear testimony/witness to something

if something bears testimony to a fact, it proves that it is true The numerous awards on his walls bear witness to his great success.
See also: bear

leading question

A question worded so as to elicit particular information or a particular answer, as in When are you selling the business? This example assumes that the person is going to sell the business, an action that may not have been established or revealed. This expression originated with a specific meaning in law, that is, "a question that guides a witness toward a desired answer." In court, this practice is called leading a witness and is forbidden. [Mid-1800s]
See also: leading, question