wither on the vine

wither on the vine

 and die on the vine 
1. Lit. [for fruit] to shrivel on the vine or stem, unharvested. If we don't get out there into the field, the grapes will wither on the vine. The apples will die on the vine if not picked soon.
2. . Fig. [for someone or something] to be ignored or neglected and thereby be wasted. I hope I get a part in the play. I don't want to just die on the vine. Fred thinks he is withering on the vine because no one has chosen him.
See also: on, vine, wither

wither on the vine

Fail to come to fruition, as in This building project will wither on the vine if they don't agree on a price. This expression alludes to grapes shriveling and drying up because they were not picked when ripe.
See also: on, vine, wither

wither on the vine

LITERARY or

die on the vine

AMERICAN, LITERARY
If something withers on the vine, it fails or is destroyed because nobody supports it or does anything to make it successful. The chance to make peace certainly exists, but could still wither on the vine. I talked to people all over this state who are worried that the American dream is dying on the vine.
See also: on, vine, wither

wither on the vine

fail to be implemented or dealt with because of neglect or inaction.
The image of grapes failing to grow is probably a reference to various passages in the Bible in which a withered vine is used as a metaphor for a state of physical or spiritual impoverishment.
See also: on, vine, wither

ˌwither on the ˈvine

(formal) gradually come to an end or stop being effective: He used to be so ambitious, but his ambition seems to have withered on the vine.
If a grape withers on the vine, it dries up and dies before it can be picked.
See also: on, vine, wither
References in periodicals archive ?
Digby Jones, CBI director-general, said: "The minimum wage has so far been a success and it should not wither on the vine, so business supports modest rises if economic circumstances allow.
John Cridland, CBI Deputy Director-General, who has written to Trade Secretary Patricia Hewitt, said: "The ECGD is vital to business but sadly it has been left to wither on the vine.
Although this is unlikely to happen until the economy recovers, he said: "We don't want to wither on the vine.
The funding gap between pupils in England and Wales only further illustrates the extent to which Labour in particular has let education wither on the vine.
This comes in stark contrast to the almost saturation cover provided by the BBC of the National Eisteddfod each year and leaves cynics to conclude it may be part of a plan to snub the event altogether and cause it to wither on the vine.
This demonstrates that these skills should be nurtured and not allowed to wither on the vine.
This comes in stark contrast to the almost saturation coverage being provided by the BBC of the National Eisteddfod each year and leaves cynics to conclude it may be part of a plan to snub the event altogether and to force it to wither on the vine.
Mr Cridland said: "The ECGD is vital to business but, sadly, it has been left to wither on the vine for the past four years.
Let them be explored before condemning Birmingham's health services to wither on the vine of short-termism.
He urged the unions - preparing for their annual congress this month - to "reform and, by encouraging flexibility, help the nation win the battle for competitiveness or wither on the vine of growing irrelevancy".
Recently we had governments who are incapable or who are prepared to allow our manufacturing to wither on the vine.
For the publicly-funded Bar to wither on the vine, and for the Bar to be the preserve only of the rich and powerful, would be intolerable
Let successful schools expand and let unsuccessful schools wither on the vine.
Today Mr Goggins said: "The Government's view was the special provisions should be allowed to wither on the vine.
If law firms don't develop their services, they'll wither on the vine ANNALEXANDER