wind


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Related to wind: wind power

wind something (up) (into something)

to coil something up into a ball or similar shape. Tony wound all the string up into a ball. Wind up the string into a ball. Please wind this into a ball.
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References in classic literature ?
So all that morning Jip stood in the front part of the ship, sniffing the wind and pointing the way for the Doctor to steer; while all the animals and the little boy stood round with their eyes wide open, watching the dog in wonder.
Because there is no other smell in the West wind but snuff," said Jip.
At daybreak the wind began to blow hard again, and the heavens seemed to predict a gale.
A single triangular sail, of strong canvas, was hoisted as a storm-jib, so as to hold the wind from behind.
Indeed, the little girl found it was as much as she could do to mount the stairs to the deck, and as soon as she got there the wind struck her so fiercely that it almost tore away the skirts of her dress.
But the wind screeched and howled so madly that she scarce heard her own voice, and the man certainly failed to hear her, for he did not move.
She looked at the red fire and listened to the wind "wutherin'.
But as she was listening to the wind she began to listen to something else.
How long this nerve-racking experience lasted I cannot guess, though we had pretty nearly finished our meager supply of provisions when the wind picked up a bit and we commenced to draw away.
Hooja's men, working in relays, were com-mencing to show the effects of the strain under which they had been forced to work without food or water, and I think their weakening aided us almost as much as the slight freshening of the wind.
After looking at Messrs Parkes and Cobb for some time in silence, he clapped his two hands to his cheeks, and sent forth a roar which made the glasses dance and rafters ring--a long-sustained, discordant bellow, that rolled onward with the wind, and startling every echo, made the night a hundred times more boisterous--a deep, loud, dismal bray, that sounded like a human gong.
Hour after hour passed away, and slowly Dorothy got over her fright; but she felt quite lonely, and the wind shrieked so loudly all about her that she nearly became deaf.
Nikita went to what had appeared dark, but found that it was earth which the wind had blown from the bare fields of winter oats and had strewn over the snow, colouring it.
The wind was strengthening steadily and the sea rising.
They stood clasped thus in the blind night, bracing each other against the wind, cheek to cheek and lip to ear, in the manner of two hulks lashed stem to stern together.