wife


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Related to wife: WFIE

a good husband makes a good wife

If a husband treats his wife well, she will treat him well in return. I do the dishes because it gives Shannon much needed time to relax, and a good husband makes a good wife.
See also: good, husband, make, wife

man and wife

Two people who are married to each other. Another way of saying "husband and wife." How are you two doing, now that you're man and wife?
See also: and, man, wife

take a wife

To marry a woman. I can't believe my son is taking a wife on Saturday. Kids grow up so fast! Is there any hope of Sir Reginald taking a wife in the near future?
See also: take, wife

take to wife

To marry a woman. Is it true that Sir Reginald is taking Lady Jane to wife?
See also: take, wife

apron strings

The extent to which someone controls, influences, or monitors someone else, especially parents in relation to their children. Mothers these days are so fussy about their kids, having to know where they are at every second of the day. They would really do well to loosen the apron strings a little, if you ask me! Sending kids to summer camps has been in decline in recent years, as parents have become less and less inclined to loosen the apron strings. Can he make a decision of his own, or is he going to stay tied to the president's apron strings?
See also: apron, string

Caesar's wife must be above suspicion

If one is involved with a famous or prominent figure, one must avoid attracting negative attention or scrutiny. Julius Caesar allegedly used the phrase to explain why he divorced his wife, Pompeia. After my son's scandal derailed my presidential bid, I understood why Caesar's wife must be above suspicion.
See also: above, must, suspicion, wife

the world and his wife

A large number or a majority of people. The world and his wife are going to be at the wedding this July. I hope I can make it too.
See also: and, wife, world

Caesar's wife

One who must avoid attracting negative attention or scrutiny (because they are involved with a famous or prominent figure). Julius Caesar allegedly used the phrase "Caesar's wife must be above suspicion" to explain why he divorced his wife, Pompeia. After my son's scandal derailed my presidential bid, I understood why Caesar's wife must be above suspicion.
See also: wife

Caesar's wife must be above suspicion.

Prov. The associates of public figures must not even be suspected of wrongdoing. (The ancient Roman Julius Caesar is supposed to have said this when asked why he divorced his wife, Pompeia. Because she was suspected of some wrongdoing, he could not associate with her anymore.) Jill: I don't think the mayor is trustworthy; his brother was charged with embezzlement. Jane: But the charges were never proved. Jill: That doesn't matter. Caesar's wife must be above suspicion. When the newspapers reported the rumor that the lieutenant governor had failed to pay his taxes, the governor forced him to resign, saying, "Caesar's wife must be above suspicion."
See also: above, must, suspicion, wife

A good husband makes a good wife.

 and A good Jack makes a good Jill.
Prov. If a husband or man wants his wife or girlfriend to be respectful and loving to him, he should be respectful and loving to her. Don't blame your wife for being short-tempered with you; you've been so unpleasant to her lately. A good husband makes a good wife.
See also: good, husband, make, wife

How's the wife?

Inf. a phrase used by a man when inquiring about a male friend's wife. Tom: Hi, Fred, how are you? Fred: Good. And you? Tom: Great! How's the wife? Fred: Okay, and yours? Tom: Couldn't be better. Bill: Hi, Bob. How's the wife? Bob: Doing fine. How's every little thing? Bill: Great!

wife

see under wives.

Caesar's wife

a person who is required to be above suspicion.
This expression comes ultimately from Plutarch 's account of Julius Caesar 's decision to divorce his wife Pompeia . The libertine Publius Clodius , who was in love with Pompeia, smuggled himself into the house in which the women of Caesar's household were celebrating a festival, thereby causing a scandal. Caesar refused to bring charges against Clodius, but divorced Pompeia; when questioned he replied ‘I thought my wife ought not even to be under suspicion’.
See also: wife

the world and his wife

everyone; a large number of people. British
This expression is first recorded in Jonathan Swift 's Polite Conversation ( 1738 ).
See also: and, wife, world

(tied to) your mother’s, wife’s, etc. ˈapron strings

(too much under) the influence and control of somebody, especially your mother, wife, etc: The British prime minister is too apt to cling to Washington’s apron strings.
See also: apron, string

(all) the ˌworld and his ˈwife

(informal) everyone; a large number of people: The world and his wife was in Brighton that day.
See also: and, wife, world

wife

n. a girlfriend. (Collegiate.) Me and my wife are going to Fred’s this Friday.

wife-beater

n. a sleeveless undershirt. (see also boy-beater.) He always wears wife-beaters with no outer shirt.

Caesar's wife

A woman whose ethics should not be questioned. A Roman emperor's wife was deemed to be above reproach; if her morals were called in question, it was a serious problem to her husband's image and political and social power. The phrase came down over the centuries to be applied to any woman, married to a leader or not, whose behavior was—or should be—beyond criticism. (According to the historian Suetonius, what Julius Caesar actually said translates as “My wife should be as much free from suspicion of a crime as she is from a crime itself.”)
See also: wife
References in classic literature ?
The circumstances under which I have become the wife of Mr.
My wife, in her impulsive way, forgot the formalities proper to the occasion, and kissed her at parting.
I felt as fond of her and as sorry for her as my wife.
The hunter's wife did as she was advised, and the first night the moon was full she sat and spun with a golden spinning-wheel, and then left the wheel on the bank.
In her despair the young wife called on the old witch to help her, and in a moment the hunter was turned into a frog and his wife into a toad.
The hunter determined to become a shepherd, and his wife too became a shepherdess.
As soon as this was over we married them; and after the marriage was over, he turned to Will Atkins, and in a very affectionate manner exhorted him, not only to persevere in that good disposition he was in, but to support the convictions that were upon him by a resolution to reform his life: told him it was in vain to say he repented if he did not forsake his crimes; represented to him how God had honoured him with being the instrument of bringing his wife to the knowledge of the Christian religion, and that he should be careful he did not dishonour the grace of God; and that if he did, he would see the heathen a better Christian than himself; the savage converted, and the instrument cast away.
Porthos, yielding to the pressure of the arm of the procurator's wife, as a bark yields to the rudder, arrived at the cloister St.
Ah, Monsieur Porthos," cried the procurator's wife, when she was assured that no one who was a stranger to the population of the locality could either see or hear her, "ah, Monsieur Porthos, you are a great conqueror, as it appears
Bullfrog," said she, not unkindly, yet with all the decision of her strong character, "let me advise you to overcome this foolish weakness, and prove yourself, to the best of your ability, as good a husband as I will be a wife.
Or do you complain because your wife has shown the proper spirit of a woman, and punished the villain who trifled with her affections?
Speaking thus of the husband, the Dean was just as eloquent and just as unanswerable when he came to speak of the wife.
I say, in answer, we have proved, first, that the wife was passionately attached to the husband; secondly, that she felt bitterly the defects in her personal appearance, and especially the defects in her complexion; and, thirdly, that she was informed of arsenic as a supposed remedy for those defects, taken internally.
Assuming her most gracious manner, my Wife advanced towards the Stranger, "Permit me, Madam, to feel and be felt by " then, suddenly recoiling, "Oh
Then he added more mildly, "I have a message, dear Madam, to your husband, which I must not deliver in your presence; and, if you would suffer us to retire for a few minutes " But my Wife would not listen to the proposal that our august Visitor should so incommode himself, and assuring the Circle that the hour of her own retirement had long passed, with many reiterated apologies for her recent indiscretion, she at last retreated to her apartment.