wide boy


Also found in: Dictionary, Wikipedia.

wide boy

Someone who attempts to earn money in a dishonest way. Primarily heard in UK. He's a wide boy who always tries to scam people out of money.
See also: boy, wide

a ˈwide boy

(British English, informal, disapproving) a man who makes money in dishonest ways: If he offers you a business deal, say no. He’s a bit of a wide boy.
See also: boy, wide
References in periodicals archive ?
While living rough they meet con men, Good Samaritans, wide boys and buskers - in pubs, burger bars and doss houses across the length and breadth of England.
Former Hoops wide boy is keen to pass on his wealth of knowledge
WIDE BOY Milner gave Poland plenty of problems FAN POWER The Wembley crowd will pump up volume
The wide boy said: "We have a great chance of going up with this squad.
But it seems more likely the wide boy will let his contract run down before considering all his options.
But the ex-Liverpool wide boy has stayed away from the headlines in recent years, and now Blackburn boss Allardyce is urging fans to give him a second chance.
Botti's hack Wide Boy was top dog, with judges commenting that the horse wouldn't have been out of place in any top showing class.
DAVID MOYES hopes that wide boy James McFadden can sparkle on centre stage this season.
But now the Hibs wide boy is taking on the role of a senior player with the Scotland Under-21s.
STEPHEN Elliott today admitted he doesn't mind becoming a Wolves' wide boy after another impressive performance on the wing.
Now 24, he tours with an act that includes his alter ego Calvin Wide Boy.
HAVING read Jenny Watson's review of The Ale House at the Royal Court,I agree with her overall rating but cannot understand why she criticised the performance of Roy Davis as wide boy Yogi.
ENGLAND cast-off Matt Banahan insists he has got his try-scoring touch back now he is settled as a wide boy.
BRAZILIAN wide boy Sammir isn't scared of getting physical with Hearts after bruising battles in his homeland.
On my way to a day of arrers at the Circus Tavern in December, I got talking to a cockney wide boy at the train station, and asked him: "Are you going to the darts?