whose


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you and whose army

A childish response to a threat, implying that an adversary is not powerful enough to carry out the threat alone (hence the need for an "army"). A: "If you don't leave, I'll make you get off this playground!" B: "Oh yeah? You and whose army?"
See also: and, army, whose

you and whose army?

INFORMAL
People say you and whose army? to tell someone who has threatened them that they will not be able to do what they have threatened because they are not strong enough. `I'll make you sorry.' — `Oh yeah? You and whose army?'
See also: and, whose

you and whose army?

used to express disbelief in someone's ability to carry out a threat. informal
See also: and, whose
References in classic literature ?
But the visionary shapes of a long posterity, for whose home this mansion was intended, have faded into nothingness since the death of the founder's only son.
Statesmen, rulers, generals, and all men who act over an extensive sphere, are most liable to be deluded in this way; they commit wrong, devastation, and murder, on so grand a scale, that it impresses them as speculative rather than actual; but in our procession we find them linked in detestable conjunction with the meanest criminals whose deeds have the vulgarity of petty details.
Soon a great national dynasty arrives whose Emperors are often patrons of literature and occasionally poets as well.
365-427), whose exquisite allegory "The Peach Blossom Fountain" is quoted by Professor Giles in his `Chinese Literature'.
That devilish Iron Horse, whose ear-rending neigh is heard throughout the town, has muddied the Boiling Spring with his foot, and he it is that has browsed off all the woods on Walden shore, that Trojan horse, with a thousand men in his belly, introduced by mercenary Greeks
What right had the unclean and stupid farmer, whose farm abutted on this sky water, whose shores he has ruthlessly laid bare, to give his name to it?
Th' infernal Serpent; he it was, whose guile Stird up with Envy and Revenge, deceiv'd The Mother of Mankinde, what time his Pride Had cast him out from Heav'n, with all his Host Of Rebel Angels, by whose aid aspiring To set himself in Glory above his Peers, He trusted to have equal'd the most High, If he oppos'd; and with ambitious aim Against the Throne and Monarchy of God Rais'd impious War in Heav'n and Battel proud With vain attempt.
Then with expanded wings he stears his flight Aloft, incumbent on the dusky Air That felt unusual weight, till on dry Land He lights, if it were Land that ever burn'd With solid, as the Lake with liquid fire; And such appear'd in hue, as when the force Of subterranean wind transports a Hill Torn from PELORUS, or the shatter'd side Of thundring AETNA, whose combustible And fewel'd entrals thence conceiving Fire, Sublim'd with Mineral fury, aid the Winds, And leave a singed bottom all involv'd With stench and smoak: Such resting found the sole Of unblest feet.
It was only his apprenticed boys whose irrepressible spirits were not affected by the solemn and respectable mediocrity of that artist.
I confess, however, that I do not think of him as a patriot and a socialist when I read him; he is then purely a poet, whose gift holds me rapt above the world where I have left my troublesome and wearisome self for the time.
The first of these two clauses, it is clear, only provides a mode for appointing such officers, "whose appointments are NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR in the Constitution, and which SHALL BE ESTABLISHED BY LAW"; of course it cannot extend to the appointments of senators, whose appointments are OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR in the Constitution[2], and who are ESTABLISHED BY THE CONSTITUTION, and will not require a future establishment by law.
And when the glance passed these bridges, whose roofs were visibly green, rendered mouldy before their time by the vapors from the water, if it was directed to the left, towards the University, the first edifice which struck it was a large, low sheaf of towers, the Petit-Chàtelet, whose yawning gate devoured the end of the Petit-Pont.
Jennings's heart, she is not a woman whose society can afford us pleasure, or whose protection will give us consequence.
Having made this rather lofty comparison I am less uneasy in calling attention to the existence of low people by whose interference, however little we may like it, the course of the world is very much determined.
The second of these children was a daughter, whose name was Molly, and who was esteemed one of the handsomest girls in the whole country.