whistle for


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whistle for

1. To summon or signal for someone or something by whistling with one's mouth. It drove me crazy the way he whistled for the waiter during our meal—it was just so rude and arrogant. Needless to say, I don't think we'll be going on a second date.
2. To expect something with no chance of ever getting it. Usually said as a sarcastic demand or instruction. If you want us to pay for your legal bills, well, you can just whistle for it.
See also: whistle

whistle for someone or something

to summon someone or something by whistling. I stood on the corner and whistled for a cab, but they all ignored me. I whistled for the dog, but it did not appear.
See also: whistle

whistle for

Ask for or expect without any prospect of success, as in If you want a cash refund, you can just whistle for it. [Mid-1700s]
See also: whistle

whistle for

v.
To summon someone or something by whistling: I whistled for my dog.
See also: whistle
References in periodicals archive ?
ChildFund is introducing the habit of using whistles to alert assistance needed through the Whistle For Protection campaign, Manik said.
It is clear that the use of the mill whistle for memorialization or commemoration is a fluid tradition and that variation has marked the practice through time.
In 2004, I was invited to whistle for New York Gov.
Perhaps people today don't use a special whistle for their children.
Their claim to fame came when the "Metropolitan" whistle was officially adopted as standard issue for the London Bobby in 1883, while the "Thunderer" became the world's leading pea whistle for referees when it was launched the following year.
That is why we are very excited to be partnering with The Whistle for this project.
A RETIRED engineer has sounded the whistle for success after beating hundreds of contenders to win a competition.
The Hudson's inventions include the Metropolitan whistle for the London Police that can be heard over a mile away (1883), the ACME Thunderer (1884), the ACME Siren (1895) and the ACME Silent Dog Whistle (1935).