whack someone

whack someone

verb
See also: whack
References in periodicals archive ?
Sandy Holland said: "Surely no amount of provocation makes it acceptable to whack someone with a large metal object.
Money from the [pounds sterling]5 'whack n' keep' souvenir pillows was donated to charity, and one of the few rules at the event was not to whack someone who was unarmed with a pillow or taking a picture.
I had to go because I knew if that happened I'd whack someone in the face, and I can't afford to do that.
He'll perform one of his renowned swandives into the ruck, interfere at the lineout, or whack someone and some gnarled Bok prop or tight forward will belt him - if the ref doesn't card him first.
To whack someone you play with is quite outrageous.
If you are going to whack someone, you are committing a criminal offence, it is an unlawful use of force.
It may look like ROD STEWART'S turning into an old codger, but really he's ready to whack someone with that natty umbrella in a, er, moody rock star tantrum.
That is quite a startling moment in dinner party conversation, because you are talking to some incredibly nice, middle-aged man, like your father, who explains that if you want to whack someone, you do it in a car through the back of a head and it's all quite clean.
If it's a Second or Third Division match and a guy in the stand sees a player whack someone does he tell the SFA they should get a copy of the game because somethinghappened in the 56th minute?
I get to whack someone with a crowbar, I kidnap a kid, I solicit prostitution, I rig a poker game - and that's just the first four episodes.
It had metal inside of it, and I'd be running along, turn around and the tail would whack someone in the head or take the sandwiches off the table.