wet

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Related to wetting: Wetting the bed, wetting myself

wet (oneself)

1. Literally, to urinate while wearing one's clothing. I had to go to the bathroom so bad that I'd nearly wet myself by the time I made it home. Sarah has just finished potty training, but she still wets herself from time to time.
2. To laugh hysterically or uncontrollably. (Usually used in the continuous tense.) Raj's new boyfriend is hilarious, he had us wetting ourselves through the whole lunch!
3. To be extremely excited or giddy. (Usually used in the continuous tense.) Abigail and I were nearly wetting ourselves with excitement for the concert to start!
See also: wet

wet

1. mod. alcohol intoxicated. He’s been drinking since noon and is pretty wet.
2. mod. having to do with an area where is it legal to sell alcohol. (Compare this with dry.) Is it wet or dry in this county?
3. mod. feeble; in the manner of a nerd. Tom is totally wet. What a jerk.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Figures 1 and 2 represent the wetting time and wetting force results for each test alloy and the test flux, using clean (non-oxidized) copper.
With clean copper and low solids flux, the wetting time generally decreased with the lead-free alloys until 271 degrees C was reached, and then the wetting time leveled off or increased slightly with higher temperature.
The binary and ternary tin, silver and copper alloys produced faster wetting times and higher wetting forces than the quaternary alloys and the control tin/lead alloy.
The binary and ternary tin, silver and copper alloys yielded slightly faster wetting times and slightly higher wetting forces with clean copper than with oxidized copper.
Wetting balance testing indicated that 271 degrees C was an appropriate solder pot temperature for the lead-free alloys evaluated when a low-solids, no-clean rosin type flux was used.
The adsorption or wetting theory - As previously mentioned, when an adhesive bond develops between two phases, in many cases at least one component passes through a liquid state thus ensuring good intimate molecular contact by wetting.
Since the intermolecular forces developed during wetting are basically of the same type as those intervening in adsorption processes, Sharpe and Schonhorn proposed their model of adhesion by wetting or thermodynamic adsorption (ref.
This effect is well known for the case of cohesive failure of polymers taking place in the presence of a wetting liquid.
Both adhesion and wetting represent fields where research today is very active.