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overstay (one's) welcome

1. To remain a guest in a place, especially someone's home, for too long, to the point where the host no longer wishes one to stay. After the cool reception I received at breakfast, it was apparent that I had overstayed my welcome at the cottage of my father's friend.
2. By extension, to do something that makes one no longer welcome in or at a place. Things were going fine at the dinner meeting until my coworker made a rather off-color joke, at which point it seemed that we'd overstayed our welcome.
See also: overstay, welcome

roll out the welcome mat (for someone)

To welcome someone with a warm or elaborate display of friendliness and hospitality. My auntie always rolls out the welcome mat whenever we call around for a visit. The principal likes to roll out the welcome mat for new teachers every autumn, so they can start off the school year on a positive note.
See also: mat, out, roll, welcome

put out the welcome mat (for someone)

To welcome someone with a warm or elaborate display of friendliness and hospitality. My auntie always puts out the welcome mat whenever we call around for a visit. The principal likes to put out the welcome mat for new teachers every autumn, so they can start of the school year on a positive note.
See also: mat, out, put, welcome

welcome (someone or something) with open arms

1. To greet someone very happily and eagerly; to give someone a very warm, enthusiastic welcome. When my brother left for the military, he and I didn't really get along too well. Now that he's coming home soon, I can't wait to welcome him with open arms. It was a little intimidating starting a new job at such a large firm, but everyone there welcomed me with open arms.
2. To be very pleased and enthusiastic about something, especially that which is new or unexpected. The president has announced a reversal on his controversial policy, and many people are welcoming the news with open arms.
See also: arm, open, welcome

I don't want to wear out my welcome.

Fig. a phrase said by a guest who doesn't want to be a burden to the host or hostess or to visit too often. Mary: Good night, Tom. You must come back again soon. Tom: Thank you. I'd love to. I don't want to wear out my welcome, though. Bob: We had a fine time. Glad you could come to our little gathering. Hope you can come again next week. Fred: I don't want to wear out my welcome, but I'd like to come again. Bob: Good. See you next week. Bye. Fred: Bye.
See also: out, want, wear, welcome

Join the club!

Inf. an expression indicating that the person spoken to is in the same, or a similar, unfortunate state as the speaker. You don't have anyplace to stay? Join the club! Neither do we. Did you get fired too? Join the club!
See also: join

receive someone with open arms

 and welcome someone with open arms 
1. Lit. to greet someone with arms spread wide to hug someone. His mother greeted him with open arms at the door.
2. Fig. to greet someone eagerly. I'm sure they wanted us to stay for dinner. They received us with open arms. When I came home from college, the whole family welcomed me with open arms.
See also: arm, open, receive

wear out one's welcome

Fig. to stay too long (at an event to which one has been invited); to visit somewhere too often. Tom visited the Smiths so often that he wore out his welcome. At about midnight, I decided that I had worn out my welcome, so I went home.
See also: out, wear, welcome

Welcome aboard.

Fig. Welcome to employment at our company. (See also on board. Invariably said in greeting to a new employee.) Glad to meet you. Welcome aboard.
See also: aboard, welcome

welcome someone into something

 and welcome someone in
to greet one as one is ushered into something or some place. The Franklins welcomed us into their home. Please welcome in our new members.
See also: welcome

welcome someone or something back

to greet the return of someone or something. We are delighted to welcome you back to our house. The students welcomed back the teacher who had been ill.
See also: back, welcome

welcome someone to something

to greet someone who has come into something or some place. I am very pleased to welcome you to Adamsville! They welcomed us to the party and showed us where to put our coats and hats.
See also: welcome

welcome someone with something

to present something to someone as a sign of greeting. (See also receive someone with open arms.) The natives welcomed us with garlands of flowers. I welcomed the visitors with gifts and good wishes.
See also: welcome

welcome to do something

free to do something; allowed to do something. The audience is welcome to ask questions at the end of the speech. You are welcome to help yourself to anything in the kitchen.
See also: welcome

welcome to our house

an expression said by a host or hostess when greeting guests and bringing them into the house. Andy: Hello, Sally. Welcome to our house. Come on in. Sally: Thanks. It's good to be here. Tom: Welcome to our house. Make yourself at home. Henry: Thanks, I'm really tired.
See also: house, welcome

You are more than welcome.

1. You are very welcome to be here. Please make yourself at home. You are more than welcome.
2. Your thanks are very gratefully accepted. A: Thank you so much. B: You are more than welcome.
See also: more, welcome

You are welcome.

 and You're welcome.
a polite response to Thank you. "Thank you for helping me." "You're welcome." "Thank you very much!" "You are welcome!"
See also: welcome

wear out your/its welcome

to stay somewhere too long, making people tired of seeing you By the time Buzz left, he had worn out his welcome with almost everyone. The TV comedy hasn't worn out its welcome, probably because its characters are so good.
See also: out, wear, welcome

you're welcome

I was happy to do it no problem “Thanks for returning the video.” “You're welcome!”
Usage notes: usually used as an answer to someone saying thank you
See also: welcome

Join the club!

  (British, American & Australian) also Welcome to the club! (American & Australian)
something that you say to someone who has just told you about an experience or problem that they have had in order to show that you have had the same experience or problem too 'I can't stop eating chocolate.' 'Join the club!' 'We can't afford a vacation this year.' 'Welcome to the club!'
See also: join

greet/welcome somebody/something with open arms

to be very pleased to see someone, or to be very pleased with something new I was rather nervous about meeting my boyfriend's parents, but they welcomed me with open arms. Our company greeted the arrival of the Internet with open arms.
See also: arm, greet, open

outstay/overstay your welcome

to stay in a place longer than someone wants you to stay One more cup of tea and then we'll go. We don't want to outstay our welcome!
See Join the club!, greet with open arms
See also: welcome

warm welcome

A hearty, hospitable reception or greeting, as in We got a very warm welcome when we finally arrived. This expression, dating from the mid-1700s, should not be confused with the similar warm reception, which from about 1700 signified a hostile welcome, as in His rivals were planning a warm reception for him.
See also: warm, welcome

wear out one's welcome

Visit for longer than one's host wants, as in She wanted to stay another few days but feared she would wear out her welcome. This expression uses wear out in the sense of "exhaust" or "use up." [Mid-1800s]
See also: out, wear, welcome

welcome mat

A friendly welcome, as in They put out the welcome mat for all new members. This expression alludes to a doormat with the word "Welcome" printed on it. [Mid-1900]
See also: mat, welcome

welcome to, be

Be cordially or freely allowed to, as in You're most welcome to join us, or You're welcome to borrow my boat whenever you like. [1300s] Also see you're welcome.
See also: welcome

you're welcome

Also, don't mention it. No thanks are needed, I was glad to do it. For example, Thanks for picking me up.-You're welcome, or I appreciate what you did for Mother.-Don't mention it. Both phrases are polite formulas for responding to thanks. The first dates from about 1900; the variant was first recorded in 1841. For synonyms, see forget it; no problem, def. 2. Also see welcome to.
See also: welcome

Welcome to the club

and Join the club and WTTC
sent. & comp. abb. The rest of us are in the same situation. So you’re short of cash? Welcome to the club. You’re just like us. Join the club; we’ve got jackets.
See also: club, welcome

wear out (one's) welcome

To visit so often or stay so long as to become a nuisance.
See also: out, wear, welcome
References in periodicals archive ?
Howard is welcomely tall, lithe, and handsome, but his pleasant voice was sometimes muffled and his phrasing and acting were tentative.
Mussorgsky's Pictures at an Exhibition, welcomely without any pre-echoes of Ravel's subsequent orchestral colourings, emerges as impatient and too easy, with little sense of the music's inherent wistfulness.
THE INSATIABLE MOON (15) Verdict: HHHII FILMED in New Zealand but produced by Digbeth-based Blue Hippo Media, this is a welcomely different film about outsiders trying to maintain their place in society.
But it's welcomely different to mainstream chase movies like the Bourne series and, if nothing else, clearly makes the point that when individuals are battling for personal survival, we should never assume the collective US military is right about everything all of the time.
New Music of the Nordic Countries brings a comprehensive overview of the contemporary music scene in Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden, each country surveyed by acknowledged experts in their field, and illustrated with copious photographs (including one of Sakari Oramo discussing a score with Finnish composer Usko Merilainen) and, most welcomely, extracts from scores.
A vinyl recording soon followed, set down in St Paul's Church, Hockley, and now it welcomely reappears on CD at a time when the work's message of tolerance and compassion seems to be needed more than ever.